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Nothing prevents collusion From former Bitcoin Core developer Greg Maxwell https://old.reddit.com/r/Bitcoin/comments/ddddfl/question_on_the_vulnerability_of_bitcoin/f2g9e7b The attack would work just as well if there were 100 people each with an equal amount and a majority of them colluded to dishonestly override the result. Also, any mechanism that would ...


3

It depends, really. Some miners on the Ethereum chain, like Ethermine, use non-conventional ordering for their benefit, aka they generally don't do the by-gas sort. Other miners can choose to sort by gas and nonce, others can choose to sort by gas and first-seen-time, others can first sort by gas and then randomize the order, others can sort by gas first and ...


3

As Mikko mentioned, it would be super difficult for them to start cooperating in such a way. If their miners find out, they can just easily switch to an "honest" pool. But assuming that those miners somehow wouldn't find out and the pools managed to cooperate, then yes they could cause some havoc. If they for example caused a week's worth of reorgs,...


2

The order of transactions (we are talking about transactions with the best gas price) is decided by the miners to make the most profit out for them. To find out more about the subject google keywords Miner Extractable Value (MEV) For example, if you send a transaction to buy some large amount of tokens, the miner will insert his own transaction to buy this ...


2

Yes, it is possible. Moreover that technique was already used against MakerDao, read https://forum.makerdao.com/t/urgent-flash-loans-and-securing-the-maker-protocol/4901. It can be fixed by requiring funds to be locked for a period of time longer than a block.


2

If you search this site there are multiple questions which ask the same thing but from a bit different angle, so I couldn't find an exact duplicate for your questions, although my answer has all the same data as those answers. The transaction order in the block is entirely up to the miner to decide. And because they can decide it, they typically choose an ...


2

The simplest answer is that the miner was paid (0.011111111111111 Ether) in the next transaction. Brief details This worked because a specific miner was sent 2 transactions off-chain. The transaction in question is the 1st transaction in block 11649597 https://etherscan.io/txs?block=11649597&p=4 Look at the 2nd transaction in the block https://etherscan....


1

As it is mentioned in data & metrics tab of the Explore, txs with huge amount of gas usage are separated and put in manual review: Extracted MEV Gas Usage % represents the overall gas usage of Extracted MEV txs as a % of the total gas usage on the Ethereum network since Jan 1 2020. We’ve added a filter on there to exclude the 5% most outlier value until ...


1

In this example i'm going to use Uniswap & Sushiswap, Lets say on Uniswap 1 ETH is 2800 DAI, but on Sushi 1 ETH is 2500 DAI You borrow 2500 DAI from Uniswap using a flash loan. With this 2500 DAI you can go to Sushi and buy 1 ETH. Take that 1 ETH and sell it on Uniswap for 2800 DAI. Now you have 2800 DAI, You payback what you borrow and now you have 300 ...


1

Uniswap has an slippage parameter that allows the final price to vary slightly. In uniswap v3 this parameter is set at 0.5%. This slack allows bots to intervene when there's an opportunity. In their first transaction they buy NIIFI increasing the price slightly, then your transaction buys some more, then their second transaction sells the tokens and profits ...


1

The official flashbots searcher onboarding guide is a good source to get started. block.coinbase in Solidity refers to the miner of the current block. You can use the ethers.js flashbots bundle provider to bundle your transactions with a final call to the Flashbots "CheckAndSend" contract. That way, the miner will only be rewarded, if the previous ...


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