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As you said, more computation is required if the block size is bigger. But mining nodes (initially) do the actual computations - they include transactions in a block and execute the transactions. So if there are more (or more complex) transactions more computation is required from the mining nodes. Other non-mining nodes do various levels of validations (and ...


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To begin with, any oracles you use are centralized services which means you have to trust a company/organization to provide the right information. That also means that you have to trust that their services are up and running when you need them. This contradicts the decentralized & trustless nature of Ethereum contracts. To use an oracle to get a ...


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Let's make some things clear first: block confirmations are not required by the blockchain, there is no static amount of confirmations to make something secure and a transaction is valid after it has been mined in a block. Now a bit more explanations. Miner nodes include certain amount of transactions in a block which they try to mine. Whoever succeeds in ...


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Ethereum's algorithm would have been better if the max() had not been used. The parent_diff/2048*(1-t/10) could have been expanded to prevent the zero that results from integer division. This would have resulted in diff = parent_diff + parent_diff/N - parent_diff*t/T/N where t = parent solvetime T = target solvetime N = extinction coefficient aka "mean ...


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