13

Simply use geth as indicated in the github wiki: Account update $ geth account update a94f5374fce5edbc8e2a8697c15331677e6ebf0b Unlocking account a94f5374fce5edbc8e2a8697c15331677e6ebf0b | Attempt 1/3 Passphrase: 0xa94f5374fce5edbc8e2a8697c15331677e6ebf0b Account 'a94f5374fce5edbc8e2a8697c15331677e6ebf0b' unlocked. Please give a new password. Do not ...


13

There is no way for the Ethereum Foundation to reset your password, but some enterprising community members have developed tools to assist with the password recovery process. If you are familiar with Python (or willing to learn some basics), the best tool so far is a particular version of pyethrecover. Let us suppose that you know part of your password, ...


10

(I've left this as an answer, rather than a wiki, to encourage multiple answers since there may be other explanations that resonate better with people) For brevity, this answer assumes that the underlying cryptography of Ethereum has not been broken. TLDR: private key = only way to access an Ethereum account password = protects private key via encryption; ...


9

pyethrecover is well documented, This is a tool for those of you who've somehow lost your Ethereum wallet password. pyethrecover is a library for brute forcing your wallet with a list of passwords you generally use. Means you will have to create a text file with possible passwords and run the pyethrecover script to check each password against your ...


8

The problem of storing private data on the blockchain is that everyone can see it. If you encrypt the info into the blockchain, by the pseudo-random property of the blockchain you can't ensure that is 100% secure. Also say that with the GDPR laws implemented now, you can't have this user's info on the blockchain, because you can't remove it if the user asks ...


5

You cannot recreate the private key file. The password is used to decrypt the key file, and then an address is generated from the private key in a non-reversible way. The private key is really the most important piece and should be backed up.


5

From the documentation: The unencrypted key will be held in memory until the unlock duration expires. If the unlock duration defaults to 300 seconds. An explicit duration of zero seconds unlocks the key until geth exits. Edit: Note that there appears to be a stray "if" in there. The second sentence should read "The unlock duration defaults to "300 ...


5

I would like to share my experience. I had forgotten my passphrase for my presale wallet, and was spending months to develop multiple passphrases to unlock it to no avail. I checked a couple of websites to look for solutions, and found walletrecoveryservices.com. Dave is a trustworthy person who somehow managed to retrieve my passphrase within a day. He ...


4

One general thing to try, which isn't specifically related to Ethereum, but added here in case it helps anyone in future from going into meltdown mode... If your password contains non-standard characters which are in different positions on different keyboard layouts, and if your keyboard has for some reason jumped between layouts, then you'll need to check ...


4

Are you aware of the bug in the Mist wallet? It is exactly what you explained or did I misunderstand? If you are confident you are entering the correct pass then its likely the bug. users reported a bug, and devs confirmed that in some cases entering the correct password will fail stating wrong PW when its actually correct. You could use the Kraken json ...


4

this is the password you got asked to enter twice when you created your account with geth account new see the documentation, you entered this password twice : $ geth account new Your new account is locked with a password. Please give a password. Do not forget this password. Passphrase: Repeat Passphrase: Address: {168bc315a2ee09042d83d7c5811b533620531f67}


4

There are no limitations in the algorithms used. Pre-sale wallets use PBKDF2 to derive a seed from the password. The current wallets use scrypt (which uses PBKDF2 internally) or PBKDF2 for the same. And that ultimately uses hashing on the passwords (in the case the password is shorter than the key length, it may not) I don't think pyethsale placed a ...


3

No. Your bkp is not the SHA3 of your password. It's really quite simple. In the beginning, god said genwallet and... genwallet says: genwallet(opts['seed'],pw,email) You say "here's my email and pw" seed says "give me super random number": seed = random_key().decode('hex') # uses pybitcointools' 3-source random generator so now you need to get ...


3

I had the same problem. I had created a wallet using geth and somehow I wrote down the wrong password. I used the simple python code below to solve the issue. I know it's not pretty, but I just needed a quick solution to my problem. Someone else might pick this up and make a proper tool, or perhaps I get around to it one day as a good python learning ...


3

The password is used to encrypt your private key. When you change the password, the client decrypts the private key using the old password and then re-encrypts it using the new password, overwriting the old file in the process. What this means is that if you have a backup of the encrypted key, you can always unlock that key with your old password. That is ...


3

There's no way to recover it, since you are the only person who had it and the wallet is now encrypted. However, you can try brute-forcing it using variations in your favorite passwords, by using this tool.


3

If you have the right private key (and from the looks of being 64 hex characters or 32 bytes it seems right), then you do not need anything else. Just import that into any client and you should be good to go. See this question on how to do it: How to import a plain private key into geth or Mist?


3

Mist is using go-ethereum (geth) as a backend. Per the string in the JSON keystore file: "cipher":"aes-128-ctr" AES-128 = Advanced Encryption Standard CTR = Counter Mode "CTR is used if you want good parallelization (ie. speed), instead of CBC/OFB/CFB." I think this cipher variable can be modified if you wanted to try something different. (More ...


3

You only need to enter your passphrase when you want to transfer some ethers from your accounts / addresses. Your encrypted keys will be stored in the following directories with one individual file for each account: Mac: ~/Library/Ethereum/keystore Linux: ~/.ethereum/keystore Windows: %APPDATA%/Ethereum/keystore


3

The account has a blank password. $ geth --dev console ... > personal.unlockAccount(eth.accounts[0], ""); true You can unlock from the command line using a --password password.txt where the file has no contents. The following commands I executed shows that the eth.accounts[0] is unlocked: $ touch password.txt $ geth --dev --password password.txt ...


3

You don't need a blockchain in order for it to be open source (and you shouldn't use blockchains to store private data, as explained by CPereez19). Instead, why not consider a local password manager such as KeePassXC or Pass? You can still rsync it or store it in a generic cloud storage solution if you want synchronization.


2

The wallet prompts for a password when you create the account. Did you try passwords that you commonly use? You can attempt to brute-force it using a file of passwords that might work using https://github.com/ryepdx/pyethrecover


2

Yes, you lost it along with the password. It is recoverable with the password. What i am guessing is, your bitcoin wallet might have some password, not the shape shift.


2

Unless you reformatted the drive, you almost certainly have it somewhere. It depends on how strong the password is. If you think the password isn't very strong, there are some fairly elaborate/powerful hashin rigs out there. Your GPU might be able to do it itself, honestly. Afraid that's all I know. :\


2

1) Is there any way to recover account if keystore file is lost? No. The private key effectively is the account, for all practical purposes. 2) Is there any way to recover account in case of forgot passphrase? If you remember at least part of your password, then there are tools to attempt recovery, covered in this previous thread: How can I recover or ...


2

Your keystore file should contain your private key in encrypted format and your password is used to unlock the private key for making actions on the account. There is no separate password file so it is more likely that you are using the wrong password or something is wrong with the file itself.


2

Make sure Mist is running. Run this command to attach to the geth daemon: geth attach In the JavaScript console you can try this: personal.unlockAccount('ADDRESS', null, 1) You will be asked for the password. This command will return true and unlock your account for 1 second if the password is correct. If it's not you will get an error message: ...


2

in short : You need your password, because your private key is encrypted with. if you want to send a transaction or to unlock your account you will be asked to provide it, so remember it.


1

Open the wallet with notepad and you will find on the end "ethaddr":your address.


1

It's possible! But it requires using command line tool Geth Read Updating an existing account You can update an existing account on the command line with the update subcommand with the account address or index as parameter. geth account update b0047c606f3af7392e073ed13253f8f4710b08b6 geth account update 2 The account is saved in the newest version in ...


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