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50

Paste the key into a text file, save it to disk and use the path to that file with geth account import. Here are some example Windows instructions that might help: Open Notepad Paste key into notepad without any extra characters or quotations Save the file as nothing_special_delete_me.txt at C:\ Run the command, geth account import C:\...


19

Use the following command in the geth console web3.personal.importRawKey("<Private Key>","<New Password>")


18

All it needed was to add a package.json file to the project directory with some babel dependencies and doing an 'npm install'. Also, adding a '.babelrc' file to the truffle project directory. Finally, adding some requires to truffle.js file. package.json file { "name": "game-token", "devDependencies": { "babel-preset-es2015": "^6.18.0", "babel-...


11

geth saves its internal states for the main network in the chaindata directory. You can find it in the directory: ~/.ethereum on linux ~/Library/Ethereum on OS X ~/AppData/Roaming/Ethereum It uses the LevelDB database. You can save this directory only if geth is stopped to prevent corruptions. The data is portable on Linux, Windows and MacOS X (i have ...


10

Files and paths are explained in detail here: http://solidity.readthedocs.org/en/latest/layout-of-source-files.html Key points: Paths In import "filename";, filename is always treated as a path with / as directory separator, . as the current and .. as the parent directory. Path names that do not start with . are treated as absolute paths. To import a ...


10

Mist has no way to import via GUI, so you need to import using command line (geth). It will show up in your Mist immediately. For Mac: Open TextEdit Paste key into TextEdit without any extra characters or quotations Save the file as nothing_special_delete_me.txt to your Desktop Open Terminal, run command: geth account import ~/Desktop/...


8

Copying the .ethereum/chaindata folder is a good idea. I've done that on my Rpi2 and everything worked fine. Also, if it's not fully synced on the original machine, the RPi2 will just start syncing from the last block in the copied chaindata folder, thus saving a lot of time. Note that I never ran geth import blockchain_db. There was no need. Copying the ...


6

For Linux: when you download the mist wallet, you'll get a folder. Inside the folder is where the mist wallet is. After you run the mist wallet, you need to get on cli. Go to /whereveryousavedtheetherumfolder/node/resource/geth/ then run ./geth account import privekey-file.txt.


6

I tried i_robot's solution, and it almost* worked, I had to add: require('babel-register')({ ignore: /node_modules\/(?!zeppelin-solidity)/ }); require('babel-polyfill'); at the top of my truffle.js. The ignore field is important!! In addition to adding babel-polyfill in my package.json dependencies: "dependencies": { "babel-polyfill": "^6.26.0", ...


5

I guess the speed comparison is against importing a Bitcoin private key. If so, the cause of the difference is due to Bitcoin is based on unspent transaction outputs (UTXO). Each bitcoin transaction consumes previous UTXOs and outputs new ones. The "balance" is essentially a derived concept, based on the sum of a wallet's UTXOs. As it's not "native", the ...


4

Answer The short answer to your question is yes you can test your keys/wallets on different OS's. Important Note: KEEP MULTIPLE BACKUPS OF YOUR KEYS IN SECURE/SEPARATE PLACES Other Comments If you are intending to only use geth across your various OS's there shouldn't be an issue exporting and importing the keys as you have described. I made the first ...


4

Copy the "Keystore" folder into the .ethereum (Hidden folder in Ubuntu) then run geth -updatedb to syncronize


4

No, you cannot import/export blockchain between geth and parity. However you can import/export wallets between clients. To import to geth you can actually try the --fast command with geth. If it is to parity its only less than 2GB the entire blockchain.


4

Copy your private key into a file, eg privatekey.txt In Linux or Mac, from your Ethereum Wallet (Mist) subdirectory, type ./resources/node/geth/geth account import privatekey.txt In Windows, from your Ethereum Wallet subdirectory, type resources\node\geth\geth.exe account import privatekey.txt In both the above options, you will have to enter a password ...


4

You won't be able to access your account without the private key which is not the same as the password. Your private key is stored in the keystore directory within the Ethereum data directory (per default ~/.ethereum on Linux). It should look something like this: UTC--2015-09-21T16-54-52.729410400Z--05936944f0d93499f636a0dfa5e71399a0cc3fca i.e., a UTC ...


4

So it turns out there is an issue in the current release...they have been notified. The work around is to use the full path. I also didn't realize that the full path is case sensitive.


4

You can't import Truffle libraries to any contract in Mix. The thing is that Truffle use your imports to build an only .sol file, so the compiler doesn't import anything. If you want to debug your imports in Mix you should copy your libraries code in the same file than your other contracts.


4

According to this, solc does not allow to import from github directly. You need to clone the repo and remap the directory path to be able to use them like in browser-solidity.


4

here is how to do it(Ubuntu): mv ~/.local/share/io.parity.ethereum/keys/DevelopmentChain ~/someFolder cd ~/someFolder/DevelopmentChain parity account import . --chain dev Caveat: if you don't specify the chain, it will import to HOMESTEAD by default.


4

In addition to stone.212's answer, here is another way: Simply follow the instructions to import a private key into Geth, and then copy your keystore file into Parity's keys folder.


3

The Ether will still be in your Ether address. Yes, you will have both ETC and ETH. If there are any other forks that use the genesis block from the Ethereum presale, you will have all those Ether too. You may want to "split" your ETC and ETH to different addresses to avoid replay attacks: this leads to a number of options for doing so.


3

This is documented at https://wiki.parity.io/Importing-a-Chain-from-Geth.html In essence, you can create a fifo using mkfifo, and then run geth export /tmp/yourfifo Put that in the background, and import to parity using parity import /tmp/yourfifo This is for the blockchain itself, not the wallet (from my understanding).


3

Nothing special needs to be done. Private keys will be imported automatically. On a typical machine, it will take around 1 hour to sync with the network.


3

I exported the full blockchain on 1.088.000 Blocks in 13 min. (1.00 GB) To import it on a Ubuntu 14.04 machine and not bad Hardware it tooks over 8 Hours! So import or fully synch from scratch is not a big difference in time. Starting the console after importing the Blockchain tooks again around 20 min. It works, but next time i would definitely try to just ...


3

Yes, you can compile two contracts that call each other. For example, contract InterfaceOfA { function f(uint) returns (uint); } contract InterfaceOfB { function g(bool) returns (bool); } contract A is InterfaceOfA { InterfaceOfB b; function f(uint _input) returns (uint) { b.g(true); return ...


3

Even if the block height of a transaction has been reached, Mist still may not display balances correctly. Wait until The blockchain is synced 100%.


3

The error you have is not related to Populus: Dynamic exception type: boost::exception_detail::clone_impl<dev::solidity::InternalCompilerError> E std::exception::what: std::exception It says Solidity cannot compile your contract because of a bug. Please repeat the issue by manually compiling the contracts from the command line and then issuing ...


3

Try pragma solidity ^0.4.7; library lib { bytes1 public constant flag = 0x01; function g() constant returns (bytes1){ return flag; } } contract test { bytes1 x = lib.g(); }


3

I seem to remember just copying them into .local/share/io...../keys. The keys I had were generated on myetherwallet though, not geth. Or depending on how you installed, it might be ~/.parity/keys. I think there is also an "import" function in the Parity UI that is accessible at port 8180. So open a browser to 127.0.0.1:8180 on a computer that is running ...


3

Here are the full steps starting from a blank truffle project. You could replace truffle init with truffle unbox <package> if you want to start from a Truffle box. Create a new directory truffle init: initialize truffle in the directory truffle install zeppelin: install open-zeppelin using ETH Package Manager A new folder will be created called ...


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