3

Per the Solidity docs: https://docs.soliditylang.org/en/v0.5.3/units-and-global-variables.html#block-and-transaction-properties Transactions can only access at most state that is 256 blocks old. That is, the 256th previous block hash. If you're trying to trace a transaction based on a block far enough in the past such that the transaction ends up referencing ...


2

You'll need to actually go through and parse the JSON to get that. Specifically the action block. See the JSONRPC call trace_replayTransaction here: https://openethereum.github.io/JSONRPC-trace-module You'll find the addresses you are looking for in those responses.


2

You can try running a trace cURL in your terminal to the node, like: curl --data '{"method":"trace_transaction","params":["0x99ac150336f74125702bb87598677c97474c5783a9258049d98377ab0773f73d"],"id":1,"jsonrpc":"2.0"}' -H "Content-Type: application/json" -X POST https://green-autumn-waterfall.quiknode.pro/2ab41411fc6296f2d7f82fa096304f21968913a8/ If it ...


1

What you have is part of the solution. You also have to look at events from that transaction. So eth_getTransactionReceipt will return the logs (and other data that will be useful for you.). also look into eth_getTransactionByHash Topic 0 is the event signature. so you would have this tab info:


1

Truffle Plugin Debugger (formerly Truffle Teams) can help: https://github.com/trufflesuite/truffle-plugin-debugger


1

Usually Events are used to achieve this (since decoding the transaction data is rather cumbersome). The smart contract you linked to as an example unfortunately has no events, but since it seems to be your code, it might be worth considering to add them. ERC20 tokens for example emit Transfer events, when tokens change the owner. There you can find from- and ...


1

I was in pretty much the same situation, except that I used an even older version of Parity (circa 2017) originally. Easiest, not very secure The easiest solution for me was to use MEW (myEtherWallet) in online mode. This is not the safest option as you're giving access to your private key, but was good enough for me because my wallet had ~$10. Go to https:/...


1

geth/parity implement the functionality of the nodes of the blockchain network and actually constitute the blockchain network


1

This is dependent on mostly two factors: The amount of hashes your hardware can solve per time unit The current network difficulty The first factor is fully up to your hardware, so I can't comment on that. The second factor is currently 4,023,833,744,841,626 (https://www.coinwarz.com/mining/ethereum/difficulty-chart). The higher the number, the more ...


1

From what I gathered I can say: Warp syncing became to complex so it is no longer made after ~1,000,000 blocks I think Warp syncing takes the same amount of storage as normal syncing, only warp syncing is much faster since you download snapshots then to the executions later.


1

Here is how you can do it using Truffle & Ganache. In truffle-config.js, extend the configuration of your network to something like this: networks: { myNetwork: { host: ..., port: ..., network_id: ..., gas: ..., gasPrice: ..., networkCheckTimeout: 9000000000, // or some other large value ...


1

Yes. You can run your own node and synchronize it fully. After that you can import the blockchain data to a local blockchain (Ganache) and use that. Then you can simulate transactions against the snapshot. Of course this is only a snapshot and you either have to keep re-importing the latest mainnet snapshot or just use a slowly decaying snapshot.


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