13

There is no way for the Ethereum Foundation to reset your password, but some enterprising community members have developed tools to assist with the password recovery process. If you are familiar with Python (or willing to learn some basics), the best tool so far is a particular version of pyethrecover. Let us suppose that you know part of your password, ...


9

pyethrecover is well documented, This is a tool for those of you who've somehow lost your Ethereum wallet password. pyethrecover is a library for brute forcing your wallet with a list of passwords you generally use. Means you will have to create a text file with possible passwords and run the pyethrecover script to check each password against your ...


6

When you mouseover the blurred private key code, the QR code sharpens (helps with security preventing shoulder-surfing, it seems). And if you print the page, the CSS of the page modifies itself to un-blur it when printed. Same thing with the text representation of the private key; it's normally shown as a line of asterisks, but if you hover your mouse over ...


5

You can import a wallet into Mist through the "Add Wallet" option. Just click the "Import Wallet" button, and enter the address of your wallet. You should then be able to send from that wallet as usual. Note that the wallet you import should be from the Ethereum or .ethereum directory, keystore subdirectory, located here: Mac: ~/Library/Ethereum Linux: ~/....


5

I would like to share my experience. I had forgotten my passphrase for my presale wallet, and was spending months to develop multiple passphrases to unlock it to no avail. I checked a couple of websites to look for solutions, and found walletrecoveryservices.com. Dave is a trustworthy person who somehow managed to retrieve my passphrase within a day. He ...


4

Are you aware of the bug in the Mist wallet? It is exactly what you explained or did I misunderstand? If you are confident you are entering the correct pass then its likely the bug. users reported a bug, and devs confirmed that in some cases entering the correct password will fail stating wrong PW when its actually correct. You could use the Kraken json ...


4

The keyfile follows the Web3 Secret Storage Definition. I believe the parts of the keyfile that are not necessary for account recovers are the address and mac value. Technically the version, cipher, and kdf are not required since you could guess from the small set of possible choices for these. Private key recovery The password you provide is used to ...


4

this is the password you got asked to enter twice when you created your account with geth account new see the documentation, you entered this password twice : $ geth account new Your new account is locked with a password. Please give a password. Do not forget this password. Passphrase: Repeat Passphrase: Address: {168bc315a2ee09042d83d7c5811b533620531f67}


4

Blockchain is meant to be a trustless system. By that I mean that you don't NEED to trust anyone to run your business on blockchain. You introduced trust when you asked your co-worker to create an account for you. At this very moment, you just disabled all the trustless system that Ethereum provided. You can try whatever you want and aggregate proofs to ...


4

Mist is actually not directly connected to the blockchain or your account. It's just a UI over top of the actual Ethereum client. If you look on your mac you should see the folder ~/Library/Ethereum. It actually contains the blockchain and your account keys in the keystore sub-directory. DO NOT DELETE THE FILES IN THE KEYSTORE DIRECTORY they are the keys ...


3

You can use your recovery sheet which contains 2 of the 3 required private keys. Place both private keys into a text file on your computer, open Geth or Parity and import it (or put it directly into the keystore of each client). Start your favorite client and make sure both wallets are imported, sometimes you have to unlock and re-encrypt them. And ...


3

I produce a tool called ethslurp (http://ethslurp.com) which allows you to download transactions into and out of any given account as Excel spreadsheets. If you have the account addresses, this may help you track down where the ether currently is. I doubt you'll ever get the money back, but perhaps he made a mistake somewhere. It's unclear to me how you'd ...


3

If you have the right private key (and from the looks of being 64 hex characters or 32 bytes it seems right), then you do not need anything else. Just import that into any client and you should be good to go. See this question on how to do it: How to import a plain private key into geth or Mist?


3

Based on your statement, there is nothing wrong with the algorithm behind the wallet. As you have supposed, the encrypted xprv can be found if you use the Chrome debug tools. We are also happy to assist with recovery of your encrypted xprv. Please email us from the account that the wallet belongs to, and we will ask you challenge questions before revealing ...


3

There's no way to recover it, since you are the only person who had it and the wallet is now encrypted. However, you can try brute-forcing it using variations in your favorite passwords, by using this tool.


2

To make a new account in Mist Ethereum Wallet dapp: Make sure that Ethereum Wallet is started Make sure you are on the Wallets tab Click "+ Add Account" under the Accounts section Type a new password Once you have a new account, make sure to make a backup (No need to delete the blockchain just to make a new account.)


2

You need to set up and sync a node on the ETC chain to see the ETC there. Also - if the original tx was not replayed on the ETC network, you will need to resend from your ETC node.


2

Yes. This is an expected behaviour. Transactions will be confirmed and included into the blockchain when it is included into a mined block. This will take at least one mined block. I don't know of any private testnet explorer. The way you track transactions in the Ethereum geth console is keep track of the transaction hash displayed after the eth....


2

There are some issues with latest version of Mist like Accounts are not showing up in Mist. Don't worry your ethers are safe. I suggest you to first check your balance on etherscan.io. The reason why you account doesn't show ethers is because the your blockchain is not in sync. Please wait until your blockchain syncs, your ethers will appear in your ...


2

The answer was to wait and try again. It usually is.


2

No. From the Ethereum presale message: You are about to make an ether purchase. Please keep the attached wallet file safe. It will serve as a cryptographic receipt of your purchase, along with your password. The password you created and entered on the sale site is the key to your ether so please do not forget it. And please note: there are no ...


2

This doesn't appear to be your correct address. I checked on etherscan and it shows no transactions in this address at all. A valid presale address should show the initial balance plus any subsequent transactions. Your presale wallet should be a json file, secured by a passphrase. You can import that into an Ethereum wallet such as MyEtherWallet or Parity. ...


2

Have you set a watch on the token contract within Parity? Due to the way tokens work on the Ethereum network, they don't show up in your wallet by default, you have to add them as a currency to watch. To watch a token balance: If you don't have a contracts tab, go to settings and enable it Go to the contracts tab and click "watch contract" Enter the ...


2

although I am not totally familiar with TaaS, humaniq and parity, all you need to do is to be able to sign transactions with the account that now owns the tokens. There must be a way of exporting key files with parity, I assume they are stored in a data dir somewhere. Import the key file to MetaMask, a plugin for Chrome to connect to the Ethereum network ...


2

All the listed transactions have been confirmed [1] with the exception of (6) which ran out of gas. It appears like you sent two additional transactions prior to the ones listed: 0xd757603d7becf46325bd36c529f6a8da92414f42f0be9c8bd030c664069d76ef, and 0xef1ce9856a3026983c3a4ed39bf28fa0ab1922222c5884771adb71c9069ff13b holding 1.995 ETH and 0.095 ETH ...


2

Whenever any exception occurs in ethereum, the transaction rolls back automatically and any ether sent is returned to the msg.sender . Etherscan shows that the ether send her been rolled back. Please check your wallet again.


2

Ethereum transactions are permanent. If the transaction failed, then the ether never left your account. If the transaction succeeded, then the ether now belongs to the contract you sent it to. If the contract is well-written, either it should have failed the transaction in the first place or it should provide a function to send the ether back to you. If ...


1

The simplest is to backup all key files and each password for every key file. A key file is encrypted that's why the password is essential. More information: How do I backup my ether accounts? and highly recommend that you test out the recovery process. (For an advanced user, all that is needed is the private key because the public key, address, and ICAP ...


1

I'm afraid your backup without the password is pretty much useless. Your backup is your account information, but you still need your password for it. You must definitely set up a password when you created this account.


1

Do you have any working example on how to correctly manage this pre-appending on a Solidity contract? You can check out the Etherdelta smart contract https://github.com/etherdelta/smart_contract/blob/master/etherdelta.sol function availableVolume(address tokenGet, uint amountGet, address tokenGive, uint amountGive, uint expires, uint nonce, address user, ...


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