1

This is the format of the json backup (sensitive data replaced with 1s):

{"address":"1111111111111111111111111111111111111111","Crypto":{"cipher":"aes-128-ctr","ciphertext":"1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111","cipherparams":{"iv":"11111111111111111111111111111111"},"kdf":"scrypt","kdfparams":{"dklen":32,"n":262144,"p":1,"r":8,"salt":"1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111"},"mac":"111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111"},"id":"111111111111111111111111111","version":3}

Looks like it's version "3".

I've tried restoring this backup into Parity, MyEtherWallet.com, but they ask for a password.

I do not recall ever having to enter a password to secure my old wallet (that this backup is from).

  • There was never an optoin to create an unencrypted wallet file. – soc1c May 29 '17 at 9:45
1

I'm afraid your backup without the password is pretty much useless.

Your backup is your account information, but you still need your password for it.

You must definitely set up a password when you created this account.

0

Assuming that you didn't store your password somewhere, your only option is to try to guess and then brute force recover your password. This article will walk you through one approach to collecting enough information to make an educated password guess.

You can then use a tool like pyethrecover to try to brute force your password.

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