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5

The project is still ongoing: https://github.com/ewasm/evm2wasm WASM seems more secure, also, webassembly is backed by Google, Apple and Microsoft, the community is also active, it's gonna be a widely used platform. So embrace WASM will be a really good choice. I'm also looking for the benchmark ...


2

The Webassembly(wasm) gives you more compatibility, portability, optimization than LLVM IR. wasm makes transactions faster and thus creates a better environment for smart contracts(It allows you to write contracts in any LLVM languages that's the reason for moving forward from EVM to eWASM) LLVM IR: 1) by default the IR is not portable >> the same program ...


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Actually the solidity compiler can output ewasm already. So you do not have to use another language if you do not want. But I do not think the change is imminent. It will take some time until changes arrive to mainnet.


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If the consensus mechanism is stored in the blockchain as WASM code and every client comes with a WASM interpreter, no forks are required anymore since every client can fallback to WASM code in the blockchain if it figures out it's own local consensus rule is outdated. Example: Client verifies block using it's local consensus rules Client fails to verify ...


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You do not need to write contract in eWASM. Just write it using solidity, and it will be converted to EVM bytecode, then eWASM. As I know so far, the eWASM is only available on Kovan testnet, so you may need to use parity to test it out if you're interested.


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A stack-based machine can be easier to implement than a register-based one, and I assume that was ultimately the decision-making factor here. The document "A Prehistory of the Ethereum Protocol" linked above hints at that. WebAssembly is also stack-based, however the assembly is designed to be structured: blocks are explicitly terminated by an END ...


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