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Update on Dec 9th, 2018 / Block ~ 6_850_000 - It's quite an annoyance to keep this answer updated. Geth (Go) Last Update: May 14th, 2018 / Block ~ 5_600_000 Client / Mode | Block Number | Disk Space ======================|================|=========== geth light | 5_600_000 | 363M geth fast full | 5_600_000 | 142G geth ...


32

Currently, the network is growing at around 1GB per month. It's hard to anticipate how large it could grow and at what pace, but there are already efforts underway to implement state-tree pruning in various clients. These techniques will contribute towards so-called "light-clients". In linked chart above, Block size evolution estimating block size in bytes ...


16

As of today, ethereum blockchain (ETH, i.e. supporting DAO fork) downloaded in full mode occupies 75GB on my drive. Client is geth (go-ethereum), version 1.4.18, built from source cloned from https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum, running on CentOS Linux release 7.2.1511.


14

I've stumbled upon the links bellow : 1- provides an online chart which presents the Ethereum's blockchain current size evolution alongside the Bitcoin blockchain's size. http://bc.daniel.net.nz/ 2- provides details about the Ethereum network including the blockchain size https://bitinfocharts.com/ethereum/


8

Benchmarks done on Homestead in june 2016 Geth 1.4.9 on i7 3720QM 16GB ram and SSD ----------------------------------------- | - | Full | Fast | Light | |-----------|--------|--------|---------| | Disk | 22GB | 4.8GB | 600 Mo | | Time | 5h | 21m | 21m | ----------------------------------------- Parity 1.2 on i7 ...


7

As of February 1, the blockchain size is ~940k blocks, with a new block being created every 17.2 seconds. This means, on average, the blockchain increases by 152,790 blocks every month. A rough average block size, at this time, is around 1,225 bytes. With this average block size, the blockchain size increase is 187MB per month (152,790 blocks x 1,225 bytes)....


6

I just created a chart that shows how much fees are ever earned daily by miners. If you want to do it by yourself, it can be calculated with a client (i.e. geth), listing all transactions ever mint and verifying gasPrice and gasUsed. A list of funny facts I discoverd during the creation of this chart. The three top most expensive transactions are: 2015/...


5

I came across this paper that looks at using Keccak-256 (the original one that Ethereum uses, not SHA3) as a PRNG. It subjects the output of the hash to a large number of tests of randomness and it passes them all. Conclusion: The experimental results show the KECCAK hash function has excellent pseudo randomness, and its security shows that it can be ...


5

etherchain.org now shows a chart of the average number of transactions per second during a given day. At the time of writing the peak was on the 6th of February 2016 with a 1.2 average transactions per second during the day. The indicator is calculated by dividing the total number of transactions on a given day by the number of seconds in a day (86400).


4

I'm syncing a node in full mode. At the moment it' on block 5005306 (end of January 2018) and it is 700Gb. It's probably been running for more than 20 days


3

I think you should think about hashrate, not about number of running nodes. As for now Ethereum Сlassic network hashrate is about 8.9TH/s, and Ethereum hashrate is 107.5TH/s. So Ehtereum Classic network "power" is 8.2% of Ethereum network. I do not know it safe or not, possible it can help you to estimate. Links: http://etcstats.net/ For Ethereum classic ...


3

Here are some places you can find the information you are looking for: https://etherchain.org/contracts - a bit harder to calculate as you will have to navigate through the many pages. https://etherscan.io/accounts/c - currently shows a total of 19,806 accounts. https://live.ether.camp/contracts - this site has a smaller subset of contract accounts listed. ...


3

The answer is here on the Ethereum wiki. It's too long to quote here. One thing to note is that when you want the value of the WS_SECRET you click on the link and it opens up Skype (if you have it installed and associated with the skype: protocol) and the value you want is in the name of the channel - you don't need to ask anyone on Skype. Another tip is ...


2

The Ethereum Chain State page has some side-by-side metrics regarding each chain. Pertinent observations as of 2nd August 2016: Block times for both chains have almost reached parity; Hash power for the non-fork (ETC) chain is ~27% that of the forked (ETH) chain; Correspondingly, the difficulty for the ETC chain is ~27% of the ETH chain. Note that while ...


2

There is some info and calculus here What is the size (bytes) of a simple Ethereum transaction versus a Bitcoin transaction? that there is around 75 trx per block. I found some other that says there is 150 trx per block. So i guess it is somewhere in that space. About the block size, there is also info in link above it is 15kb per block.


2

I can't speak to this specific chart but if you fast sync a Geth node the final result does include the state. So, I assume that this chart does include the state. It only includes the most recent state though.


2

If you wanted to do this thoroughly, and without relying on Etherscan's ambiguity, you will have to use a full node or Infura to learn information about the accounts and contracts that exist on Ethereum. Definitions First, we have to ask the question: What even are ETH 'accounts'? I can generate a random public/private key pair on my computer and ...


1

I don't think you can. A bad block is (by definition) nonsense that is emitted by a node and subsequently ignored by peers. They're not propagated across the network because they're useless. If I'm not mistaken, any attempt to do so would create an unacceptable DoS vulnerability because the network could become saturated with chit-chat about noise coming ...


1

Not quite what you're asking for, but worth noting for future reference is the statistics view on ether.camp. It won't give you the amount of ether, but does chart the number of different types of transactions over time for a given address.


1

If you are interested in aggregated stats this site offers quite an interesting mix of statistical functions to explore both transactions and block size https://bitinfocharts.com: transaction stats blocks stats


1

Yes, blocks with 0 transactions are still valid blocks, and add to the security of the chain. There would be no reason not to show them, given that a block with 0 transactions potentially has other important characteristics, such as uncles. Edit: Note that transactions and uncles are stored separately from one another in the main body of the block, in two ...


1

Amberdata.io has a page dedicate to transaction data, including a graph of the average transaction fees: And for those interested in APIs (as I am) you can even get current average gas prices with their gas predictions endpoint!


1

With ETC being so new, it may take a few weeks for all of the good tools to emerge that will help us observe the sort of data you are asking for. In the meantime, two comments: 1) this is, of course, quite dynamic. Nodes on either blockchain can and do change frequently. So be aware that there is no clean static answer for you. 2) two sites that both ...


1

I agree it's not well described. One data point in 24 hours lets me assume it is the daily count of distinct miners. So, it's not a percentage but the number of discinct miners in the last 24 hours, e.g., how many different accounts mined a block in 24 hours.


1

Amberdata.io has an API that can do this pretty easily: curl --request GET \ --url 'https://web3api.io/api/v1/addresses?type=contract' \ --header 'x-api-key: <x-api_key>' Response: { "status":200 "title":"OK" "description":"Successful request" "payload":{ "totalRecords":6505274 "records":[ 0:{...} 1:{...} ... ...


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