14

The way I check is: Find out what the last block is. https://etherchain.org Start geth with console (https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum/wiki/Command-Line-Options) When geth is running enter the command eth.syncing eth.syncing will show you your block sync info. You are looking for currentBlock. Example: ./geth console eth.syncing Output: { ...


10

short answer too, that will take the exact opposite stance as @nicolas-massart ;) in the long run you'll be always better off mining solo, ever because you get uncles and pay no fees pool mining reduces your variance, period. this reddit post is quite interesting, it's basically @vitalik-buterin asking as to why people mine in pools. It's not true for ...


9

You are most likely mining on some test-net or your own private network. similar discussion here: https://forum.ethereum.org/discussion/5569/am-i-mining


7

This is because you are mining as part of a pool (nanopool), with that being said, any blocks found by the pool are mined collectively and the reward (5 ETH for a block + transaction fees or uncles) is distributed or shared amongst pool miners proportional to the hashing power contributed by each miner. The solutions you find are part of a bigger solution. ...


6

Short answer : don't try to solo mine with less than 100MH/s[1]. You will almost never get reward as, during the time you will spend mining, the difficulty raise will lower your luck of mining a block so much that you will finally never mine one. [1]: note this value gets higher as the time passes.


5

Compare the value in the log file in the field named number with the value of the last block here https://etherscan.io If it equals or near to equal it means that your chain synchronized.


5

The first thing to check is if the node you are working on is synced. If it is not synced, it will let your mine old blocks and you'r balance will grow untill yout get synced. It then zero's yout out.... one clue is that there is no gas additions to your mining rewards. In the same screen as the checkBalance comand, try... eth.syncing If the current ...


4

Antminer S9 13 is an ASIC-based Bitcoin miner - it won't work for Ethereum, I'm afraid. Ethereum uses a different hashing algorithm to Bitcoin, partly to ensure that ASIC-based hardware can't be used to mine ETH. See: Is Ethereum ASIC resistant? By what mechanism are ASIC-based miners made less favourable? Ethash Design Rationale


4

Yes you can. You can set the mining beneficiary (aka etherbase or coinbase) to any address you want, even a one that nobody has a private key of.


3

You should calculate your average block mining time on something like etherscan mining calculator before trying to mine.  It will take you an average of 117.39 days to find 1 Block But mining difficulty will raise so much during this time that you probably won't mine anything. Pure lost plus you burn your hardware. So unless you have at least 50MH/s, ...


3

It's very easy to calculate reward probability with a little information. What is the Network's Global hashrate, Blocks/day, and your percentage of the global hashrate. Because of the law of averages and luck involved in hashing algorithms, your variance in hitting a block time-wise will average out over the higher amount of set data. Simply divide your ...


3

Mining isn't like, well, actual mining, it's more like flipping a coin; each attempt at finding a block is independent of the previous one. As a result, there's no 'progress' to be lost by restarting.


2

I'm not sure how you got 1.57 days :) Current network hash rate is 19678.50 GH/s, or 19678500000000 H/s. Your current hash rate is 10 MH/s, or 10000000 H/s. Block time is ~14.91 seconds. Plugging these into the calculation: network hashrate / personalrate * blocktime = time to find a block (19678.5 GH/s / 10 MH/s * 14.91 s) = ...


2

On hard fork the PR 2813 was introduced to support the network split and those two options were added. This PR implements setting the --support-dao-fork and --oppose-dao-fork flags. As of now they only modify a single database entry specifying whether the current default behavior should change. Nowadays both options were removed and the official ...


2

You can use different methods. (1) Find out what the latest block is from someone who is up to date (or a online block-explorer like etherscan.io / etherchain.org), compare that to where your chain is. (2) Once you start importing blocks 1 by 1 every ~15sec, instead of in chunks of 20-50, you are probably up to date.


2

You can stop and start without hurting your chances very much. Mining doesn't take a fixed amount of time, there's no progress to be lost. Every 15 seconds you have a relatively fixed probability of finding a block, regardless of when you started mining.


2

Here are some ideas. UserHashMh A couple of options, best described in previous answers. Might depend on which mining software you're using, or if you're part of a pool. How to quickly check Ethereum Hashing Speed? How do I check my mining hashrate? difficultyTH Use web3.eth.getBlock(blockNumber).difficulty. BlockTimeSec Using web3, subtract the ...


1

It does mean that an entity has found a way to mine as much, (or more) 0xbtc than some particular mining pools, however, it doesn't have to mean that the public address belongs to a particular individual, it could also be an unidentified mining pool of people which operates like the other already identified mining pools. In regards to the mining process, ...


1

Enabled Stratum on my node, then ethminer -G -P stratum+tcp://127.0.0.1:8008 worked for me.


1

You mentioned a private chain on ethereum, Quorum from JP Morgan is a go at that. It's a permissioned, private fork of ethereum. Also, there is a little bit of a misunderstanding I feel(maybe on my part), if you are talking about a private chain that you manage. You are in-charge and infact, responsible for providing your own miners. The official ...


1

No, you are just syncronizing to other peers and updating your blockchain state.


1

For MacOS, the following should work to sync the computer's clock with a time server (though you seem to be on Windows): %> sudo sntp -s <time_server_hostname> The sudo is needed to execute the command with root permission. MacOS can also be set to automatically sync with a time server via System Preferences -> Date & Time settings. On ...


1

Ether is a denomination of currency, like dollars and cents. ETH is a currency (arguably), like US currency and currency of Great Britain. Also, one ETH means one ether in the Ethereum main net like one USD means one dollar in the US currency and one GBP means one pound in the Great Britain currency. The reason why your balance dropped was because your ...


1

I think it would be geth -G --etherbase value (0 or 1) depending on how many accounts you have. You having 2 accounts, you choose which one you want. Default value is 0 so I'm guessing you want the second account geth -G --etherbase value 1 is what I think you would type.


1

You can use a Poisson table to determine how many blocks you can expect to find in a given amount of time. For example, at 1 Gh, the expected value of how long it will take you to find a block is 9 days (Network difficulty is ~800TH and you have 1GH/s, so 800TH/(1GH/s) = 800000 seconds). So in a 27 day period, assuming difficulty does not rise, you can go to ...


1

This was caused by somebody who tried to make copatibility with Fedora work. add --std=c++11 to the NVCC flags in CMakelists.txt in libethash-cuda folder So, actually, you have to make some change to the cloned source. download: git clone https://github.com/Genoil/cpp-ethereum.git cd cpp-ethereum/libethash-cuda vim CMakeLists.txt Change from set(...


1

Not an answer, just advice... It doesn't really matter if you find a block or not, because in the process of doing so the graphics card of the laptop will eventually die. Laptops are not meant to be used that way.


1

This question has gotten a lot of views and still no answer so I thought I might as well post what I know. I haven't done much related to Ethereum lately so it might be a little outdated. Basically, the guide gives as an example miner.start(8) which is pretty small. You're here to get your ether as soon as possible so you don't need to think small. In the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible