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Loops often increase the use of gas, moreover if you need to perform searches. In your contract, there are several of them, including a nested one in function getTabs. Try to change to data structure to avoid using them at all.


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There is no security issue when making getter functions, period! A getter function is constant (typically view), hence does not change the state. Therefore, such function cannot yield a security breach by definition. You may have a security issue in some non-constant function which calls some getter function, but that security issue will not be resolved ...


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However, messages sent to Smart Contracts (SC) aren't signed No. All transactions are signed by an externally owned account (EOA). Transactions sent to contracts are signed by an EOA. A contract runs code, and that might include sending a message to another contract. In this case, the message is not signed because it doesn't need to be signed. The ...


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Provided you are using the same algorithm that ETH uses for your private chain, you will always have to mine in order to create blocks and process transactions. Since it is a private blockchain, there should not be many miners on the network, and thus the hashing power should be low. Because of this, you are able to mine with a simple CPU and very little ...


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Just a update to this question, but this time it use a technique call verifiable delay function (vdf). It was built based upon time lock puzzle invented by Ronald L Rivest et al. The core idea behind is that if you can't calculate the result in a set amount of time, then the result is pseudo random. So with that in mind, vdf is a function which take in an ...


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Signing a transaction is a one way cryptographic operation. The private key cannot be derived from the signature. Moreover, the signature must be readable because it verifies you are the creator of the transaction. Also, all transactions are public. So, yes your wallet is safe.


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My revised answer to the main headline question is that inevitably there are 2^96 keys that will produce colliding addresses because the limit on the address space is 2^160, and keyspace is nearly 2^256. So even though each distinct public key and resulting Keccak hash digest maps distinctly to just one private key, given the use of Keccak in the address ...


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