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You can develop and test on a private network, even one node or an emulator such as ganache. You can migrate to one of the larger public testnets for a public-facing debut/test. Just for clarity, contracts on testnets cannot interact with mainnet in any way, so you can't use a factory or token on a private network or testnet to deploy contracts or work with ...


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You can use any network you like. You just have to point your web3 (I assume you're building a website, but makes no difference really) to the right node which is connected to the right network. It's only a matter of security/trustlessness/transparency etc. You can point your project to whatever backend you want and users don't typically even know whether ...


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You need to enable UDP rule for port 30310 for ec2 instance running bootnode. Problem while setting private ethereum network on AWS using bootnode


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Check the inputs of the transactions. I had the same problem. I was giving wrong inputs to the transaction.


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I think you need to run mining process. Try to run in console the command miner.start() then to stop mining run miner.stop(). Of course, the mining rpc api should be activated when you run geth geth --rpcapi="miner"


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Think of your VM like a completely different machine. It has another IP for example. 127.0.0.1 accesses localhost and therefore your host machine. So how do you fix this? You need to connect to your VM with the correct IP. Go into your VM and run the command ifconfig. A lot of stuff gets returned. You will surely recognice the correct IP when you see it. ...


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The contract looks fine and I confirmed with a little superficial fiddling in Remix using the JavaScript VM. A common stumbling block when transitioning to "real" chains is the need to wait for transactions to confirm. If you are setting and checking without someone first mining a block that contains the set transaction, then you will read the old value (...


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Provided you are using the same algorithm that ETH uses for your private chain, you will always have to mine in order to create blocks and process transactions. Since it is a private blockchain, there should not be many miners on the network, and thus the hashing power should be low. Because of this, you are able to mine with a simple CPU and very little ...


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AWS cloud services you will use EC2: miners and customer nodes ECS: container deployment between EC2 devices. VPC: network access to all resources in the cloud Application load balancing: access to all resources in the cloud Cost of using the template for 2 days: $ 4.85, estimated in one month: $75.6 Sorry: oneyearlater


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Can you google sidechain dapp please and see if this is what you are looking for ?


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There are a number of bridge services readily available for Ethereum, obviously the use will depend on your exact use case, but here are a selection of projects for you to review: Parity Bridge: https://github.com/paritytech/parity-bridge Ion: https://github.com/clearmatics/ion And here is a sample project of having 2 Quorum blockchains implementing a ...


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Currently there's no way to extend a private contract to other parties (although this is on the Quorum/Tessera roadmap). So at the moment, you would need to do it manually or within the contract itself by reading data from the old contract.


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When --nodiscover is used at the time of starting a geth node, it prevents the node to be discovered by the bootnode in the network. As a result, the geth node will not join in Ping-Pong request exchange of UDP discover protocol. If you want your geth node to be discovered by the bootnode, make sure --nodiscover is not used geth --datadir datadirpath or in ...


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