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You are able to deploy contracts with a static address if you are using the account only 1⁻shot. this even works across different ethereum based Blockchains. A nice Method is to Fake the Signature like it is done in ERC 1820 - therefore it is garanteet to have this adress, because the nonce is always the same. https://eips.ethereum.org/EIPS/eip-1820 //todo:...


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Azure provides an RPC security layer that enforces access control to the network. In order to provide authentication to your RPC interface you can use basic authentication, certificate based authentication or you can link to your identity provider. After you are part of the network (rpc auth passe) you have Quorum state authorization layer (what is called ...


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You are correct - anyone with the address & ABI can call a public contract. The only way to prevent this is to have code within the contract that checks for calls from authorized addresses. If a private key is lost then the contract would need to be updated to replace that authorized address. I suggest you take a look at Quorum's smart contract based ...


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You can do that but there are some subtleties to work out. It is recommended to use a withdrawal pattern rather than sending a transfer to someone other than msg.sender. There are security concerns talking to more than one untrusted contract at a time, so the safe bet is to just do some accounting rather than intiating a .transfer(). An exception is token ...


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If your node changes a block, the hash of that block changes and probably the state root. A few things happen. Every block after is invalid. You would need to remine them all. The blocks your node receives from others would appear invalid and blocks your node sends would appear invalid to them. It's a fork unless all nodes agree. The threshold for ...


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This depends on your requirements, and can't be answered simply. To help guide your thinking, I'd suggest: 1) Is a blockchain really needed? You have said you are new to this space, so perhaps review your requirement against the charts here: https://medium.com/@sbmeunier/when-do-you-need-blockchain-decision-models-a5c40e7c9ba1 2) Public or Consortium ...


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You can also use https://github.com/blk-io/epirus-free nice UI, and stable


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You can think of this example. When people talk about Home Automation, it deals with personal data like the door lock, lights on/off, heart beat from smart watch etc. When you talk about a Blockchain, the need for various nodes that provide some transnational data is the common expectation. So in order to combine these two technologies, you might want to ...


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Anything in config section of genesis is applied directly onto the geth regardless of the blocks it may have already in its chain. So, if the chain is up to lets say block 1000, you can enable new hard forks such as constantinople or istanbul by setting your constantinopleBlock to 1100 and then istanbulBlock to 1200 and it will work. That said, some caveats:...


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The exact answer to this will depend on the concrete usecase. Basically there are two main parameters you can tweak on: block time (how fast to produce blocks?) block gas limit (how much to include in a block?) How you're going to set these parameters, will depend on your environment: UX (e.g. User waiting for x seconds to get a confirmation for a ...


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PoA networks do not natively have rewards baked into the consensus. There are instances where these are created with smart contracts that make system calls (see Energy Web Chain and POS_DAO) , but if you run clique natively there will be no block rewards. References: EIP 225 POS DAO Energy Web Chain - System Contracts - Rewards Contract


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