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You can do it programmatically via web3.js (tested with v1.2.1): const Web3 = require("web3"); const web3 = new Web3(); const contract = new web3.eth.Contract(YourAbiArray); const options = {data: YourByteCode, arguments: [YourArgs]}; const transaction = contract.deploy(options); console.log(transaction.encodeABI()); Note that YourByteCode should start ...


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The block gas limit can be controlled by two geth command line options --miner.gastarget value Target gas floor for mined blocks --miner.gaslimit value Target gas ceiling for mined blocks


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If I'm understanding the question correctly, there shouldn't be any inherent difference between a private and public network. Depending on how you are selling the tokens, you could either have the price adjust using logic in the contract, or off-chain. On chain has the potential to be more transparent, as nodes on the network can see the contract logic, and ...


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You have a create node1 folder mkdir node1 first and then use ~/node1/


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Azure MBS uses Quorum configured with IBFT consensus. In IBFT mode, Quorum will continuously advance the chain even if there are no pending txns, unlike Raft configuration. This is done to ensure that the chain remains viable thru validator communication and rotation and blocks are created at a regular interval (I believe its 1 minute on Azure). You can ...


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TL;DR: no. The hex part of the enode address is the public key of the node. It's the one generated from the node's private key. Having the same public key would mean having the same private key on all your nodes which would not work as they would be considered as the same node and conflicts would happen. Your private keys have to be specific for each node.


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While there are a few sources of normal variance: Different EVM versions have different OPCODE pricing Conditional branching in contracts, including ERC20, can lead to a range of possible transaction costs There is no good reason for a valid transaction to shoot up many orders of magnitude. Unless it is a very strange token contract, there would be no ...


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Based on this comment: i want to run multiple nodes on different machines with the same genesis.json To run multiple nodes, you have two solutions: Solution one: Static nodes One your second (or more) machine, instal geth and initiate the genesis like you did with the first one. Into your datadir/geth, create a file named static-nodes.json. This file ...


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