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You can assign the addresses an arbitrarily large amount of ETH when you start the network, and then have a way to mint ETH on demand. As it's a private network, that ether doesn't have any real value.


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You can think of any Ethereum-based network, quite literally, as a collection of independently running pieces of software spread across the world. They are 'sending messages' to each other in a certain agreed-upon format. The 'agreed-upon' format is called the protocol which is a set of rules for forming the messages. In order for any particular Ethereum-...


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Any data in the blockchain is public. So, no, your scenario is not possible. Even if you use contract visibility settings such as private it only means that the data can't be used by other contracts but humans outside the blockchain can still get that data.


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What you are doing looks correct. Basically, if privateFor is missing, then the transaction is public. You must specify privateFor in order for the transaction to be private. All the nodes specified in privateFor (plus the local node) will become participants in that private transaction. Any attempt to access the contract, or the state, from a non-...


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I had some private discussion with the author, but it is related due to the full access to the API's via HTTP, which a bot changed the miner address. So I would sum it up as this: Do NOT leave Ethereum nodes with all RPC API's open to the public. (If it wasn't you, then check what can be used to change it.)


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Private ethereum blockchain is having an ethereum client running in local mode with non-default configuration of ports and connections. Otherwise it behaves and acts like a regular ethereum node. By contract, Quorum private blockchain offers a set of services that is not available in a regular / plain vanilla ethereum blockchain. These are: Privacy -- in ...


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I've never heard of a concept called hierarchical blockchains. If your concept requires some interaction between the blockchains you have to use something else than Geth, but I have no idea where you could start. The whole concept is rather... weird. Which doesn't necessarily mean anything bad, just unheard of.


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