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I think we can mount external storage and to set it as ancient data folder --datadir.ancient value Data directory for ancient chain segments (default = inside chaindata) ref: https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum/wiki/Command-Line-Options


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Since Quorum is based on Ethereum, node recovery is very straight forward and would behave in a similar manner as regular Ethereum nodes. In Quorum, you need to make sure to back up all geth node keys (generally, nodekey and wallets from nodedata folder). If this node goes down, you create a new node with the same keys and allow it to connect to the ...


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Fast synchronization is usually OK, you download both blocks and states. However, using full synchronization you only download the blocks, and compute the states yourself. It takes MUCH more time, but you are sure the states are valid. If you don't mind waiting it's always a plus to do it full, but for most cases fast suffices. Concerning the required size, ...


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If you need a custom solution, firstly know that what is stored on the blockchain is the compiled version of the contracts, i.e., the bytecode. You can decompile it with certain tools, but obviously it won't yield the original result. However, there are many contracts in Etherscan whose source code is published, like this one. You can get the full list of ...


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Yes, you can use these two flags at the same time The commands can vary depending if you're setting up for a public network or private network. I'll assume you want a to connect to mainnet. So pass the --mainnet flag and it will configure everything for you, network ID, genesis, and bootnodes. Same can be done with --rinkeby and other known networks. The ...


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Currently a default full node takes around 200GB of space: https://etherscan.io/chartsync/chaindefault . It makes sense that you need a full node to stake in Eth 2.0. I doubt anyone really knows at this stage how much space a full node requires in Eth2.0 - that's not a particularly aspect at this phase of the development when we are still far from the full ...


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You can build a DApp to inspect the environment and: use a local node if one is present fall back to use one or more node-as-a-service pools. The latter offers the convenience of an install-and-go user experience. Many new users will be unfamiliar with the deeper design issues of decentralization such as removing a single point of failure or the ...


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First let's get the fundamentals sorted. You connect to a blockchain through a node which implements the blockchain. So a node is a client program which runs code that makes up the blockchain - the blockchain consists of nodes. There is no way to connect to the blockchain without a node (be it yours or somebody else's). So a dapp uses some web3 library (...


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