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You can create a DAO which can buy the NFTs and then you can fractionalize ownership of the DAO however you want. This notably happened to purchase this NFT: https://www.theblockcrypto.com/post/99615/uniswap-v3-nft-sold-dao-half-million-dollars


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For the curious, here is how I treated my problem : For a pseudo-random distribution of my 200 family, I separate the claim on two way : The first way is a pseudo-random number with keccak function on my post. This is the way for 4500 token. When assignToken > 4500, the function go to a second party The second way is to send the next claim to the token ...


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This is a very important topic, and it's been pointed out that not enough attention is given to it. Ultimately, immutability is a bit of a spectrum. If somehow every last device storing the Bitcoin and Ethereum networks would be destroyed, the networks would be lost. Fortunately, that is improbable enough to not worry about. Similarly, even IPFS is not as ...


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It checks if the address to already registered a digest made of the hash of the address to and an array of uint256 called ids. If it has not already registered that digest, the transaction will revert (it will be cancelled). That's what require do. In that case, the error message will be "Hash not registered".


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It's because of the lower fees and because of the hype that BNB is experiencing. Those defi applications you mentioned, along with all the clones and scams that you find, are all inflated and if you invest any money you take a big risk to see your funds gone.


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According to several formal implementations, ERC721 is not supposed to a divisible token by itself. Although, you can deploy an ERC721 through an ERC20 and distribute its shares using the fungible ERC20 tokens.(not my idea, check below link) Watch this for full explanation: DeFi + NFT Tutorial | Code a Re-Fungible Token (Solidity + Tests)


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I think you are referring to the base URI that is often set at contract creation. Your metadata is a json file that contains information about the nft e.g. its name, description, image url. The token URI is the link that points towards this metadata json file, sometimes made by concatenating the baseURI with the token ids. So, to have a different metadata ...


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Yes, you can make changes in the functions (e.g. changing the metadata URL), but you cannot change the number/types of input arguments nor return values, because this would violate the interface (see Function Overriding for more details). Note that if you were inheriting from ERC1155Mintable, you could also call setURI to update your metadata URLs.


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Generally speaking, the NFT is just that: an NFT. It has no copyright or other usage implications, unless there's a legal contract made up for that separately in the traditional sense. To answer your questions: No, authenticity is not guaranteed by ERC-721 NFTs themselves. There would have to be some other system in place for that. ERC-721 tokens have a ...


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It depends on what function is called. If you open the link you can see four transactions. Click any one of the transaction hashes, select click to see more and there you will see the function that was called. This transaction 1 consists of a bid function where obviously a certain user would have placed a bid on the token during the sales auction as is ...


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I think best solution would be that you set up your own local Ethereum node, and filter all the transactions of this contract. Let's suppose the contract was created at block X of the Ethereum blockchain, then once your node is fully synced you can filter transactions from the transaction in which the contracted was created in block x till the present date. ...


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as of the time of this comment, I have not seen guides or educational materials on how to deal with this. We're definitely at the frontier. It's theoretically possible for you to "burn" your existing NFTs and replace them with a token on an ERC-721 contract. But this will probably be expensive in terms of gas fees, and also require a lot of trust ...


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I think there's a distinction to be made. As Lauri Peltonen pointed out ERC-721 contracts usually store ownership info in a mapping (tokenId -> ownerAddress), so they surely have state. But you specifically mention NFT marketplace contracts. Those are used to auction and facilitate exchanges between parties. To achieve this goal they may have to store ...


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You are correct in thinking what is stateful and what is not. A contract is stateless if it doesn't do any state changes, such as changing storage variable values. But NFT contracts aren't stateless. They don't store much, but they store enough. Most importantly, they store information about the token owners in a mapping. Furthermore, they contain other ...


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You aren't missing anything. There is only artificial scarcity. One could argue that physical goods also have artificial scarcity. For example, a sports card company could print thousands of Michael Jordan rookie cards in 2021 - but they wouldn't be worth very much.


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An important distinction here is "an NFT" versus "a unique digital representation of an artwork." Like Lauri says, each NFT is technically unique. But we don't yet have a way to ensure there is only one NFT issued against a piece of art. Someone could issue multiple NFTs against the piece of art on the same smart contract, or across ...


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You will understand the whole process better once you do it by own. I will recommend this for experimenting: ERC721-Redroad When we want to sell an NFT on a third party platform, we have to transfer the ownership of the ERC721 token to this third party, so that it can sell to buyers. None of the third party is allowed to transfer the ownership of your NFT.


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@Dylan pointed it out correctly. The openzeppelin implementation doesn't have any function for this. One other way to do this is parsing events, as they are emitted on each transfer. This may get computationally expensive, so you can use TheGraph for indexing purposes.


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If you want an ownerOf in ERC1155 youll have to implement it yourself. rarible and opensea use indexing services like thegraph.com to keep track of transfers and who currently owns the token.


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Seems like you have two problems - the first is ownership verification and the second is trusted exchange. The first is pretty easy to solve with the OpenZeppelin docs for ERC-721. Looks like you're looking for ownerOf(tokenId), which assuming you know the address of the ERC-721 contract and the tokenId should return the address of the owner which you can ...


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In a blockchain like Ethereum every operation is public. If someone creates more copies everyone will be aware. Another difference is that every token has its own serial id and that cannot be copied. Even if they create more copies there will be just one token with id equal to 1.


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For everyone who has this problem and the install of HDWallet version 1.2.3 is not working, check the HDWallet version used for the project on package.json file. If the version is different from the installed, you need to install it using the command --save: npm install @truffle/hdwallet-provider@1.2.3 --save And be sure that you are doing this command on ...


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Given Rob's answer, you now know the question isn't "How much would it cost to store 60 GB?" But here's the answer to that question anyway... The current price of ETH is ~$1650. The Yellow Paper states that storing a 256-bit (32-byte) word costs 20,000 gas. Average gas price is currently ~160 Gwei. That's 160 x 20,000 Gwei per 32 bytes, which is 3,...


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The size of the video is immateriall. The general process would be to store the video in an unambiguous location. IPFS is a favorite choice because the content of the video will generate a unique fingerprint (hash) that doubles as the filename/url. Any change to any pixel in any frame would generate a completely different hash. The NFT would store the hash ...


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You got the answer yourself: ERC1155 gives you the combination of fungible and non-fungible tokens within the same standard contract. In essence, you still have a non-fungible token with its ID, like ERC721, but you can mint tokens for such NFT with fungible tokens, like ERC20. A typical use-case for this standard could be game cards: you have a card called '...


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Well, as you said, it's in your test wallet. What else do you need, since you have the test Ethers there? If you mint it in a testnet and someone buys it, they buy it with testnet Ethers, which has no monetary value. So you have gained 1 of testnet Ethers. The transaction of 1 Eth only exists in the Rinkeby testnet (https://rinkeby.etherscan.io/tx/...


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Make use of Etherscan API: https://etherscan.io/apis#accounts There is an endpoint to Get a list of "ERC721 - Token Transfer Events" by Address. Create an Etherscan free account and get an API key so you can query that API endpoint


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Cheap/simple -- use the OpenSea API. Robust/exhaustive -- you'll need to write your own client. 0xcert has one we might be able to share. And it will monopolize a full server to run + stay synced.


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https://twitter.com/AntyDziadzior Lets talk about your problem. I'm working on it in my project.


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https://mirror.xyz/ is a publishing platform protocol that allows the tokenization (NFT) of essays and writing.


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If contracts is an ERC721 then you can query how many tokens a user owns with balanceOf uint count = token.balanceOf(user); if (count > 0) { // User owns at least 1 index } If the tokens implements the optional ERC721Enumerable interface you can use tokenOfOwnerByIndex to retrieve the tokenId of owned tokens by a user. try token.tokenOfOwnerByIndex(...


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As Ismael points to in the comments, it would seem that the author of the linked comment in the OP's question was not pointing to SuperRare being on-chain and Foundation off-chain, but was emphasizing that the value of SuperRare as a curator. The "on-chain" provenance comment likely means that being able to point to an NFTs on-chain history means ...


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They serve different purposes allPunksAssigned A better name would be allInitialPunksAssigned. All operations are disabled until a set of initial punks were assigned by the contract owner. punkIndex All values between 0 and 9999 were available. A user was able to choose their favorite number in that range. punksRemainingToAssign Counter of assigned punks. ...


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So the question was an underlying question while trying to understand how all these platforms like OpenSeas are identifying all of the minted tokens for standard ERC721 and ERC1155 contracts. It was perplexing because there's no "getAllMintedTokens()" method in the standard smart contracts. So without further adieu, the answer is by searching for ...


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The smart contract ABI and code are public on Ethereum net. You could find the NFT contract that you want to retrieve info (https://etherscan.io/) and call the public functions on it... Hope it helps


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