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2

Opensea did not supports the BSC network. But you can mint the NFTs on Polygon for cheaper fees. Polygon is supported by Opensea platform. Reference: Which blockchains does OpenSea support?


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Probably the most secure way is to have the links already in the minting contract (which is possibly the same as the NFT contract) and the contract then chooses the right link for the to-be-minted NFT. If you input the link as a parameter to the minter, it means that a user can mint an NFT with any arbitrary link, just by calling the contract directly. This ...


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Looks like you have been following Twitter today. The user in question actually had their private keys compromised by a fake OpenSea email spam. However attack vectors can be launched on smart contracts, so that when you interact with them or approve them they are given access to your wallet. Not sure exactly how it happens but it is through malicious code. ...


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you just own or transfer to someone else wallet or use the contracts to sell your integer which represents the cryptopunk number on the "marketplace". they released the whole image hash of all cryptopunks in the blockhain. But it's a proof concept, not an nft. Now, if you have this whole image it's not that hard to "extract" the related ...


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I am not totally sure I understand your question, and what you can and can not change, and what is the difference between snaToken and myToken. You are checking the balance of snaToken but then sending myToken - what exactly is happening there? But anyway, do you know of the allowance mechanism? (functions .approve and .transferFrom) You can use it to do ...


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you should use tx.origin instead ofmsg.sender, If there are multiple function invocations on multiple contracts, tx.origin will always refer to the account that started the transaction irrespective of the stack of contracts invoked. However, msg.sender will refer to the one that called the contract, could be a smart contract address.


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As you may have learned, Metamask cancels a transaction that has not been mined by replacing it with a transaction where you send 0 ETH to yourself. This method works for cancelling any transaction, including NFT minting transactions that have not been confirmed in a block. If you want to replace a transaction yourself by manually setting the nonce of your ...


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I suspect this has nothing to do with Solidity versions. The safeTransferFrom function in Solidity really means keccak256("safeTransferFrom(address,address,uint256)") for the Ethereum Virtual Machine. But let's not get lost with details. When you call safeTransferFrom, the caller of this function needs to have been approved via the approve function,...


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You can simply write an interface with the 0.7.6 version. The interface doesn't care with what Solidity version the target contract is compiled with - it simply states what functionality the target contract has. You can basically write the interface in any version you want (although best to write it with a version which explicitly supports interfaces). I ...


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According to etherium.org All smart contracts and state changes on the Ethereum blockchain are executed by transactions. https://ethereum.org/en/developers/docs/ethereum-stack/ Therefore the creation of the NFT must be the result of a transaction. Additionally Transactions are cryptographically signed instructions from accounts. They also define the ...


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It appears you are very early in the design process and are still studying existing solutions. So I'll reply here with just some broad concepts. Good luck on your journey! Fully off-chain This is the approach OpenSea uses. Everybody with a token needs to approve or, more likely, approveForAll their tokens to the OpenSea marketplace contract. Commitments are ...


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my guess would be that you're hitting this require statement require(supply + _mintAmount <= maxSupply);, what are you doing exactly? calling the mint function with your address and 5000 as arguments? Or are you just trying to deploy the contract? if so you're probably hitting the gas limit


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I found the answer to my problem. The clone factory was missing the transferOwnership of the token contract which prevented the caller to call the functions of the clonable contract. function createNFTContract(bytes32 salt,string calldata name, string calldata symbol,string calldata _tokenURI)external isRegisteredUser returns(address){ NFT ...


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Nothing. That's one of the reasons why services such as IPFS are preferred. With IPFS you can't change the contents while keeping the same URL.


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Yes you can One way to do it would be to override the mint function or create your own function to create an NFT. function create(uint256 id_) external payable { require(msg.value == mintingFees, 'No fees provided'); _safeMint(msg.sender,id_); } The override statement will prevent the call from going to original erc721 mint ...


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