8

For Geth you can connect to the public testnet (Morden) via: geth --testnet For other clients and for a full explanation plese refer to this wiki page: Ethereum wiki / Morden If you don't want to use the main public testnet you could use another public testnet, for that you have to specify at least these parameters: geth --networkid=12345 --genesis ...


7

A few ideas. The network ID is output in the logs when the node is first started: I0110 21:51:32.687353 eth/backend.go:191] Protocol Versions: [63 62], Network Id: 1 I0110 21:51:32.726772 eth/backend.go:219] Chain config: {ChainID: 1 Homestead: 1150000 DAO: 1920000 DAOSupport: true EIP150: 2463000 EIP155: 2675000 EIP158: 2675000} If you haven't started ...


6

Olympic has the network ID 0. It was the pre-release testnet launched in early 2015. Somethimes this network is referred to as Ethereum Version 0.9. It was discontinued in July 2015 when Ethereum officially launched and replaced by Morden. Morden has the network ID 2. It was the first full release testnet launched parallel to Frontier public main network ...


6

If not, then it should be possible to replay transaction on multiple networks, isn't it? Replay protection was introduced in EIP-155 by incorporating the chainID into the v part of a transaction's signature. So in effect, yes, the transaction does have knowledge of which network it is on. From the Specification part of the EIP: If block.number >= ...


5

Rename truffle-config.js to truffle.js.


5

In addition to --networkid 3 starting geth with --testnet also makes sure that you use the correct genesis node for Ropsten. You can start Ropsten also this way: geth init ropsten_genesis.json && geth --networkid 3


3

Network id and Chain id are the same thing You can edit NetworkId in eth/config.go & params/config.go and get rid of this problem forever, you won't need to specify network id on the commandline anymore. Ethereum's geth has hardcoded the value 1 in the files I told you , so this is why you have these problems. The chain id is now part of transaction as ...


3

There are only full nodes (which have the full blockchain). The light clients are not available (see "LES" client). Bootstrap nodes are the initial nodes (in the network view), you don't need to discover them.


2

If you can't telnet then there is something wrong with your networking. Either your virtual network connection between hosts is the problem or there is a firewall blocking connections. If you are just getting started then I'd keep things really simple first of all and: Use standard geth nodes Run your nodes on one virtual machine on different ports e.g. ...


1

Passing the whole artifact file to truffleContract make it work, ie something like ... const ContractJSON = require('./build/contracts/Contract.json'); var MyContract = truffleContract(ContractJSON) ...


1

For syncing purposes, it doesn't matter whether it's the mainnet or a test net like Ropsten. This is how the process would somewhat proceed: Your Geth client will look for peers in the network. It uses ÐΞV's p2p network protocol for discovering and connecting to peers. Read more here, it's a repo of documents, so you might want to read relevant markdown ...


1

maybe u can try geth --rpc --rpcaddr 52.208.46.161 --rpcport 8546 attach http://0.0.0.0:8546


1

From various places in the Geth code, it looks like it's defined (and handled) as a BigInt. (The actual upper limit will be architecture dependent.) For example, in config.go: // MainnetChainConfig is the chain parameters to run a node on the main network. MainnetChainConfig = &ChainConfig{ ChainId: big.NewInt(1), I'd assume that the other ...


1

From your comment on the other answer... Lets say I start the first node with these commands Commands: geth init genesis.json geth --networkid=5501 console The above part looks good. What should be done on second node to load the first node's location? Should the other node also execute below: geth init genesis.json geth ...


1

Private blockchain Everyone is equal, and can mine the transactions. Basically you need to share your genesis block with the other party and once they initialize their chain, you have to add their enode addrees as peer. Permissioned blockchain Permission is built into your blockchain client, where you can decide based on the other party cryptographic ...


1

Any particular reason you want to do this only with Ethereum? I would say, start with a permissioned blockchain,one which does not require ether/ gas to participate. I also suggest reading on the difference between public, private and permissioned blockchain.Then you can think about what fits the use case you are trying to build. It is imperative that ...


1

A geth node must have the same networkid as well as the same genesis block in order to join a network. The geth node also needs to know the enodeid of the peers you want to connect to. The geth client has a hardcoded list of bootnodes for the mainnet and official testnets. You'll simply be connected to a different network if you have the same networkid but ...


1

--networkid 3 is the new testnet specifically, Ropsten. 1 is the main blockchain and 2 is the old testnet, morden. When you use geth --networkid 3, it sets the default testnet to Ropsten, so after you've done it once, --testnet will bring you on Ropsten.


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