New answers tagged

0

At OpenSea you can create / mint your own token via their web interface. At first, you create it and it becomes available in search, but not for sale. I assume at this point it's not minted yet and only exists in their database. After that you have an option to "bake" the metadata whereby you mint it and your NFT can be sold / purchased after that. ...


0

Are you creating both token A and token B, just token B, or neither? It sounds to me like you're creating both of them? Correct me if I'm wrong here, but to sum up it sounds like you're creating contracts for ERC20 tokenA and ERC20 tokenB, and whenever an amount of tokenA is transferred, you want the same amount of tokenB to be transferred to the same ...


0

Minting and Exchanging are two separate operations. On Opensea, you can mint your own NFT before listing it for sale. You can also mint it and sell it in a single operation, using the OpenSea Storefront Collection. So basically, most marketplaces will support any ERC721 you mint yourself, but some will also give you the option to mint and sell in a single ...


0

There is a clear front-running issue with the claimTokens function. Let's say that user A sends a claimTokens transaction with a signed message as the sig parameter. User B (evil) sees the transaction in the mempool. To claim the tokens that belong to A, all B has to do is copy the parameters of A's transaction, including sig, and send its own claimTokens ...


2

In general there is no issue in using ecrecover the most important part is how you create the hash that you sign (e.g. include the contract address and chain id into the hash to prevent replay attacks) Most wallets don't let you sign data that could potentially be a raw transaction. Therefore you have a couple standards for signing. The most notable ones are ...


0

Make mint and burn internal functions that are only referenced in lock and unlock functions. That way the user will have the tokens minted only when they lock their ETH (and noone will be able to access the mint function outside the contract) and burn their IETH when they unlock.


0

Answer of 1: Yes, it is minted in blockchain. You could test to mint somethings using testnets.opensea.io. It will ask for some gas fee during the 1st time listing but you could use the fake ETH to overcome that. Answer of 2: I have no idea about Rarible, but I can see without paying the 1st gas fee, I can still see it in blockchain and include the NFT in ...


0

Unless you deployed an upgradable contract, the answer is yes, you will need to deploy a new contract since contracts are inmutable.


0

with ethers or web3js, you'll be able to interact with contracts from your frontend. if you're using plain javascript, you can use cdn links to import respective libraries. shown below with ethersjs const provider = new ethers.providers.Web3Provider(window.ethereum); const signer = provider.getSigner(); const contract = new ethers.Contract(address, abi, ...


0

From the transaction trace with Tenderly https://dashboard.tenderly.co/tx/mainnet/0x15b500b479a04486a1bd355ca6791c084f9fe48a55a6f2615753adf071ac6fcf It just run out of gas while minting the last token. To deter why one address did work and the other didn't you'll have to consider the state of the contract at the time. For some operations, like modifying ...


0

No. There is not. ............ But there are efficient ways to mint lots of tokens. In fact, the first ERC-721 contract is Su Squares // https://tenthousandsu.com I created it specifically as a demonstration that it is possible to mint lots of tokens with a low per-item gas fee. It is cited specifically in the ERC-721 paper for this purpose, and we minted 10,...


Top 50 recent answers are included