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Why A transaction may succeed or fail depending on when/where it was mined. The initial state matters and that is only knowable when the transaction exists in unambiguous transaction order. Consider getting paid on the same day rent is due and your landlord has a post-dated check. The order of events, the transaction order, may be the determining factor (...


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failed tx's get into the block because they consumed your gas anyway, the gas is translated to ETH with the term multiplication gasUsed * gasPrice = ETH


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To begin with, any oracles you use are centralized services which means you have to trust a company/organization to provide the right information. That also means that you have to trust that their services are up and running when you need them. This contradicts the decentralized & trustless nature of Ethereum contracts. To use an oracle to get a ...


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As you said, more computation is required if the block size is bigger. But mining nodes (initially) do the actual computations - they include transactions in a block and execute the transactions. So if there are more (or more complex) transactions more computation is required from the mining nodes. Other non-mining nodes do various levels of validations (and ...


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Checking the link provided in the previous answer or here, you can get to know that your transaction was put into a block numbered 8244682. Drilling deeper, this block was created by a miner node who gave her address as 0x5a0b54d5dc17e0aadc383d2db43b0a0d3e029c4c first. She then broadcasts it to her peers. Technically all the nodes who have received this ...


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You can only have one validator i.e. the miner that added the block . If you are talking about confirmation, a block is confirmed after the 5th block is added to the chain i.e your block + 5 more blocks. If you take the average blocktime of 15seconds, your block (15s ) + 5 more blocks (5 * 15 = 75) - 90 seconds. Here is your transaction on aleth.io https:/...


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Ethereum's algorithm would have been better if the max() had not been used. The parent_diff/2048*(1-t/10) could have been expanded to prevent the zero that results from integer division. This would have resulted in diff = parent_diff + parent_diff/N - parent_diff*t/T/N where t = parent solvetime T = target solvetime N = extinction coefficient aka "mean ...


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Let's make some things clear first: block confirmations are not required by the blockchain, there is no static amount of confirmations to make something secure and a transaction is valid after it has been mined in a block. Now a bit more explanations. Miner nodes include certain amount of transactions in a block which they try to mine. Whoever succeeds in ...


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