54

There's not currently any way to do this using the web3 API. Internal transactions, despite the name (which isn't part of the yellowpaper; it's a convention people have settled on) aren't actual transactions, and aren't included directly in the blockchain; they're value transfers that were initiated by executing a contract. As such, they're not stored ...


25

To do this, you need to define a VM log collector, which implements StructLogCollector. This function gets called on every step of the VM, and is provided with copies of the memory, stack, and modified parts of the storage, along with the program counter, current opcode, gas left, and other data. It's also called when an error occurs that causes a ...


23

In the Ethereum protocol there's only transactions and message calls. A transaction is a type of message call. A transaction may perform other message calls, but these are not transactions (even though blockchain explorers may label them inaccurately as "internal transactions"). These (internal) message calls are not published on the blockchain. To find the ...


19

Fortunately, Geth EVM has new tools to get this done. It's possible to use debug_traceTransaction with RPC API. In NodeJS: var web3 = require('web3').web3; web3.currentProvider.sendAsync({ method: "debug_traceTransaction", params: ['0x3fac854179691e377fc1aa180b71a4033b6bb3bde2a7ef00bc8e78f849ad356e', {}], jsonrpc: "2.0", id: "2" }, function ...


15

In Solidity, by default, yes. On the EVM-level, a throw (bad jump, out-of-gas, or any other exception) only reverts the call it is inside. Solidity helpfully continues the exception down the stack until everything is undone. It is possible, using lower-level code (specifically, address.call()), to prevent this. Here is an example of this being used as an ...


13

Internal transactions, despite the name (which isn't part of the yellowpaper; it's a convention people have settled on) aren't actual transactions, and aren't included directly in the blockchain; they're value transfers that were initiated by executing a contract. Check these answers as well TheDAO internal transactions How to get contract internal ...


11

To complement @Matthew's answer, it depends on how the call is made in Solidity. If C calls D.foo(), and foo does a throw, then yes the entire transaction is reverted. If C does a "lower-level raw call" like D.call(bytes4(sha3('foo()'))), and foo does a throw, then only foo and its subcalls are reverted. This is because a raw call does not propagate any ...


11

In the Ethereum protocol there's only transactions and message calls. A transaction is a type of message call. A transaction may perform other message calls, but these are not transactions (even though blockchain explorers may label them inaccurately as "internal transactions"). These (internal) message calls are not published on the blockchain. To try ...


10

From the Yellow Paper: Transaction: A piece of data, signed by an External Actor. It represents either a Message or a new Autonomous Object. Transactions are recorded into each block of the blockchain. This means that a transaction represents either a Message or a new contract. Message: Data (as a set of bytes) and Value (specified as Ether) that ...


10

An internal transaction is not a real transaction - it has no signature and is not included in the blockchain. It is the result of a contract initiating a value transfer, or calling another contract, typically using the CALL opcode.


9

If I understand your question correctly you want to be able to see who has deposited Eth to your contract address. This is what event logs are for. (1) Create a contract where there is an event every time there is a transaction. e.g something like: contract someContract { address public owner; // Set the owner of the contract to be the ...


8

1) Is what I said above correct? Yes. 2) Other than by clicking on EtherScan's 'Internal transactions' link, how can I possibly know about these 'internal' transactions? This has come up a couple of times recently. Block explorers use their own instrumented versions of the EVM, so to do something similar you'd need to implement your own. ...


7

1) Yes. 2) See following. Here's a wallet executed internal transaction - 0xcad1183ecf7f278713858d92c06f00934f79a75eb5c852352a3ac35de07e151c. I use the following to firstly extract the debugging information: user@Kumquat:~$ geth --exec 'debug.traceTransaction("0xcad1183ecf7f278713858d92c06f00934f79a75eb5c852352a3ac35de07e151c")' attach > ...


5

Did this account generate Ether out of thin air? No. Ethereum isn't broken, and neither are ENS or Etherscan. Although Etherscan could be clearer about what's happening here. So how do you get the real balance? If you click into the most recent transaction issued by the account (the one with 0 outbound value), you see this: Sorry it's awkwardly clipped. ...


4

There's no practical difference - ether is ether, regardless of how it arrives. Value transfers made by contracts won't show up as separate transactions, though some block explorers are capable of showing them, either associated with the original transaction, or associated with the account that received the transfer. ether.camp has a more comprehensive view ...


4

You could try using the etherchain.org GetAccountTransactions API that is documented at https://etherchain.org/documentation/api/ . Eg: https://etherchain.org/api/account/0xbeef281b81d383336aca8b2b067a526227638087/tx/0 will give you the transactions as displayed at https://etherchain.org/account/0xbeef281b81d383336aca8b2b067a526227638087#txsent Etherscan ...


4

You can use callTracer introduced in geth 1.8 https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum/pull/15516 $ nc -U /work/temp/rinkeby/geth.ipc {"id": 1, "method": "debug_subscribe", "params": ["traceChain", "0x0", "0xffff", {"tracer": "callTracer"}]} The API will stream back one IPC notification per non-empty block. An exception is the very last block, which will ...


4

There is actually one more transaction you are missing, which can be found on the "internal transactions" tab: https://etherscan.io/address/0x9a77d0900323b5f2b6cff6138569846406cf7456#internaltx When you include this transaction, you will see that the books balance again. Internal transactions are those sent by a contract instead of directly from a ...


4

Looking at your transaction 0xdd6c0059b330dc... both transfer were done correctly. For example the second transfer is to address 0xbc965738eabb38..., you should look at the "Internal Transaction" tab, there's a line where "Parent Hash" is 0xdd6c0059b330dc... and block is 1287872 for an amount of 0.05402... Ether. Usually "internal transactions" are not ...


4

Etherscan API allows getting the internal transaction by address. The description of the tool can be found here: https://etherscan.io/apis#accounts and an example is this: https://api.etherscan.io/api?module=account&action=txlist&address=0xddbd2b932c763ba5b1b7ae3b362eac3e8d40121a&startblock=0&endblock=99999999&page=1&offset=10&...


4

Looks like the answer to your question is CREATE2. This is an EVM opcode that was created to allow contracts to be created deterministically, (other people use the term 'counterfactually') It's a fairly complicated topic. One link is here: https://hackernoon.com/using-ethereums-create2-nw2137q7 but there are many you could check out. Perhaps most simply ...


3

There are two kinds of function call in Solidity which are very different. Internal calls happen via a JUMP command and can be used with any function not marked external. These are far cheaper than external calls and mantain things like msg.sender, msg.gas, calldata, etc. Internal calls can only happen within a contract, and can access functions marked ...


3

With recent versions of Parity (tested on 1.8.3) it is also possible. The RPC method is trace_replayTransaction. The corresponding code is something like web3.currentProvider.sendAsync({ method: "trace_replayTransaction", params: [desiredTransactionHash, ['trace']], jsonrpc: "2.0", id: "1" }, function (err, out) { console.log(out); } ...


3

According to Parity's 1.1 version announcement, you could do it with it if you switch to this client. Quoting: New JSONRPC APIs for tracking, tracing and inspecting all message-calls and balance transfers, including those that happen as "internal transactions"; Haven't tested it yet though.


3

For get information about internal transactions, you can use the debug_traceTransaction The method will return a full trace of the transaction. By the opcodes and parameters of each step, you can get the information you need. There are 2 main problems: 1. Identify the working principle of the opcodes, because for example, not always CALL results in an ...


3

You can do it with both Parity and Geth using a normal node (with some additional configuration params). Parity has the trace JSON RPC module, and Geth has its debug module. Parity offers trace_transaction whilst Geth offers traceTransaction.


3

This must be done off-chain for standard tokens. The ERC-721 standard specification -- http://eips.ethereum.org/EIPS/eip-721 -- does not provide an interface to query historical ownership of a token. Other extensions to the standard may include this additional functionality but this will be implemented on a contract-by-contract basis. For example, ...


3

I'm considering now using etherscan site Net Internal Transactions, I might resort to webscraping with beautifulsoup, but I don't know if anyone knows of a better alternative with python based api that does this (takes in a hash, returns internal transactions) that interacts with either etherscan/infura... You should definitely consider using Etherscan ...


2

I am not sure what you mean about "getting the internal transactions", but perhaps you have misunderstood how ethereum functions, so here is a quick primer. Nothing changes, no variables are updated, and no code executes on their own. The ONLY time anything changes is when the following conditions have been met: A transaction is sent to the contract. The ...


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