8

The only way I can think of to make this work is to require that DAO accounts are tied to real life identities. The verification process itself (3rd party verification of passports, notary seals, etc) would still rely on some element of trust. Even with an identification system there would be know way to know if some people were acting as proxies to control ...


5

You can unlock the account using below command on geth console: If you have not created more than one account on geth then use - personal.unlockAccount(eth.coinbase, 'your account password in quotes', 0) The first argument in above command is the account hash(address), second is the password in quotes and third is the time in seconds till the time you ...


5

The knowledge of a public key (such as Ethereum addresses) should never be used as method of authentication. Public keys are meant to be shared, for instance to receive a payment in a cryptocurrency. If a client can just provide that address to autenticate, then everybody who knows the public address could impersonate the client. The following JavaScript ...


5

This topic is called "proof of individuality" and is open for a great solution. One possible solution works as follows: Around the planet, participants are meeting at the same time via video-chat and uniquely identifying one another. This should supposedly not allow anyone to be present in two videochats at the same time. From then on, the keys which have ...


4

This is a bit theoretical and I don't know of a practical way to use this right now but one thing people have been discussing is Proof of Passport. Modern passports contain data signed by the government that issued them, which can be read with an NFC reader. In theory it should be possible to create a Zero Knowledge Proof of information in the passport, so ...


3

[Your question is quite broad, and may get flagged as such... ] Have a look at uPort, the white paper for which is entitled "uPort: A Platform for Self-Sovereign Identity". It contains some pseudo-code, which might help generate some ideas. Anything on Consensys's official media stream containing the "identity" tag might also be helpful. Also of interest ...


3

For identity management I don't see the necessity for IPFS. The identity portion is all done through private/public key encryption. Since only the holder of the private key can decrypt a message signed by their public key the private key holder can validate their identity. This works in reverse a message signed by the private key holder can be decrypted ...


2

I'm building a similar system. Some data stored on the blockchain, some stored in a traditional DB, and my personal approach may interest you. Is safe to login into a classic account with just the web3.eth.accounts[0] and no PW? The question that you are really asking is "Can you trick web3 into believing you control the private key of an address when ...


2

Unfortunately nobody supply me the document. I guess it serve my purpose. If you are working on the same thing probably help you also. https://github.com/WebOfTrustInfo/ID2020DesignWorkshop/blob/master/topics-and-advance-readings/a-self-sovereign-identity-architecture.pdf


2

Recently came across a project in alpha: https://fortmatic.com Docs seems pretty good, was able to get things working pretty fast. It triggers a modal in an iframe for user auth (similar to Stripe or Plaid) - imo this feels like a better ux as the end users never have to leave the main dapp experience


2

You're generally describing a trust-verification system ("Can I trust that Alice is who she says she is?"). Public/private keys allow you to concretely prove a message came from a particular private key, but the question then becomes do you trust the private key to be truthful (about anything; shipping addresses, names, the weather, etc.). There are several "...


1

The procedure of generating the transaction is the same, but the value will always be pseudo random due to the nature of hash function. This post will be a good one to refer. However if the network is public, given the transaction hash, it is possible to get the transaction details using the web3 api as documented here. It will return the address of the ...


1

Had you seen this Auth0 module? https://github.com/auth0/ethereum-authentication-server


1

Whether they know the identity or not, doesn't make them more or less decentralized. Then, on the other hand, you have to be a bit more specific about what you mean with "know the identity". Many decentralized apps have limited functionality for only certain users. For example Uniswap liquidity can only be withdrawn if you have he required LP ...


1

You can keep a list of the names you have used when you create new NFT instances. E.g.: mapping(string => uint256) public userNames; // user name => token ID Then, whenever you want to create a new NFT, you require that the name hasn't been used before: function addNFT(string memory _name, uint256 _id) external { require(userNames[_name] == 0, '...


1

I would override the default behavior of _transferFrom method, but is not clear what you mean by "1 copy of this NFT". Each NFT has its own token ID, did you mean to check if actually Address #2 is owning already 1 NFT, no matter the token ID? You may make use of ERC721's balanceOf() or tokenOfOwnerByIndex() methods.


1

Rather than using credentials or an NFT, maybe just have the user interact with your application through their ethereum address / wallet. Any changes to this address's account in your application would require a signed blockchain transaction or a signed message from this account. This is the way many daps work today. The recommendation of your site would be ...


1

The problem here is that you have marked the insertOrigin() function as external, but it needs to be marked public since you are making an internal call the way you have written your code. function insertOrigin(string _airportName, uint32 _checkInTime, uint8 _bagWeight) public { ... } Take a look at the visibility documentation. External ...


1

You could let the user post a signed message to their Twitter account and let them write the permalink to the Tweet into your smart Contract. Everyone who wants to verifiy the identity, could then do it for themselves.


1

According to ethereum documentation- Public blockchains: a public blockchain is a blockchain that anyone in the world can read, anyone in the world can send transactions to and expect to see them included if they are valid, and anyone in the world can participate in the consensus process – the process for determining what blocks get added to ...


1

Ethereum is a public and open protocol. As such, any node that follows protocol is welcome to participate. Having said that, there are approaches to addressing this concern. A team may form a private network where nodes are separated from the public internet, or use a variant of the protocol such as JPMorgan's Quorum which includes membership constraints ...


1

There is none. That aspect of Networks and channels don't exist in Ethereuem since the latter is a public and not permissioned blockchain network. In these types of blockchain access is granted to all members (nodes) in the same way : All Read and Write(send) right to all transactions. This makes the Ethereum network a single network where all nodes belong ...


1

The identity consists of two main parts: Keys that owns and controls the identity and Claims that belong to that identity. ERC725: Identity Keys Is used to manage unique identity for humans, groups, objects, and machines. This identity can hold keys to sign actions (transactions, documents, logins, access, etc), and claims, which are attested from third ...


1

We need to consider the fact that we do not need a blockchain at all, and could be implemented perfectly well using a regular relational database. But while you read through this article that I have recently posted on linkedin, you would not only understand how a blockchain can solve such a use case but also a need to have a technology to solve this.


1

Would that be in line with the spirit and the general idea of Ethereum and/or pose a security threat to users? Cryptographically proving your identity with Ethereum is a use case that has been discussed quite a lot. Signing a pre-defined message, or random challenge as you suggest, could be used somewhat similarly to today's 'signing in with Facebook' that ...


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