18

Ethereum Mainnet blocks #0 (genesis block) and #1 (first mined block): > new Date(eth.getBlock(0).timestamp * 1000).toUTCString() "Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 UTC" > new Date(eth.getBlock(1).timestamp * 1000).toUTCString() "Thu, 30 Jul 2015 15:26:28 UTC" 0.1 #200,000 Ice Age Source: u/accape's statement "There is also the very first HF shortly after ...


13

Update Jun 02 2017 From WARNING: Do NOT Use SafeConditionalHFTransfer! Or Use It Correctly: The SafeConditionalHFTransfer saved a lot of ethers being moved incorrectly on the wrong chain after The DAO hard fork. So far there has been 20549 txns + 16022 internalTxns passing through the SafeConditionalHFTransfer at ...


13

Update Apr 12 2017 There are only 3 more days to withdraw your refunds from the WhitehatWithdraw contract. There are still 1,651,062.7506 ETC (USD 4,292,763.15) remaining in the withdrawal contract. 87% of accounts have NOT withdrawn their refunds. Check this spreadsheet to confirm that you have withdrawn all your refunds. Following is a chart of the ...


11

According to the long list of Ethereum exchanges found here: https://coinmarketcap.com/currencies/ethereum/#markets Cryptopia appears to be the only one that has announced that it will remove Ethereum Cryptopia Ethereum trading volume is extremely small (less than 1 BTC in ETH/BTC trading volume for the last 24 hours). Therefore the global liquidity impact ...


10

The Homestead block will be 1.150.000 for the main network which means the Homestead transition will be roughly around midday on Pi day and the Homestead block for the Morden network will be 494.000. Source


9

ETC has the same network_id = 1 as ETH (see this question for the list of known network ids). As ETH and ETC nodes use the same wire protocol they can connect to each other and send blocks and transactions. But ETC and ETH have different sets of bootnodes predefined in their clients. This results in two non-overlapping networks. To distinguish ETH and ETC ...


8

A hardfork is a change in the protocol that is not backwards compatible, ie transactions from nodes running the older software will not be considered valid. With a soft fork nodes running an older version of the software could still publish valid transactions, they will just not have the latest and greatest features.


8

I'm using the same unmodified script from How many ethers have been drained through the recursive call attacks on The DAO? to calculate the balance of The DAO and it's child DAOs. For a finer categorisation of the different child DAOs, see the latest update from How do I get a refund for my The DAO tokens that was split into a child DAO?. There are several ...


7

Tehcnically, there is no a minimum number: if just a 3% of the network opt to not adopt the hard fork, they can technically set up their own network, send transactions and deploy contracts just using the ethereum protocol: just they can't interact with hard-fork adopters nodes. However, is expected that, if a small pool of nodes does not accept the hard ...


6

The easy, low-tech way to do this for ETH held in a regular Externally Owned Account is to create two new addresses, one for each chain, and send a transaction on each chain moving your ether to a different address. Once that's done any subsequent replayed transaction will be coming from an address with no ETH in it, and will therefore be invalid. It's ...


6

A general solution is EIP 155 Simple replay attack protection. Starting with Geth 1.5.3 and Parity 1.4.4, they implement EIP 155 so that your ETH transactions should be safe from a replay attack on ETC. Create another account and move all your ETH to the new address. Don't forget to backup this new account (and don't delete the old account since it has ...


6

Yes, an account before the DAO-fork will have Ether on both chains: ETH and ETHC. It's not a double spend in the usual sense, because when you send ETH to Alice, you cannot send the same ETH to Bob. You could send ETH to Alice, and ETHC to Bob, but they are separate blockchains (similar to how you could send BTC to Charlie, except that ETHC account ...


6

Updated 00:57 Aug 20 2016 UTC - using BigNumber to accurately compute the totalSupply figures. Checking Your The DAO Token Balance From ETC withdraw contract to be reviewed you can check your The DAO token balance at pre-hard-fork block 1,919,999 using geth synced to the Ethereum Classic chain using the following commands: geth --fast --oppose-dao-fork ...


6

The Baddies joined into the Split Proposal #59 where they were not the curator. From this split, the Baddies created a number of split proposals where the Split Proposal #59.10 was used to split out the attacked funds into a split where the attacker was the curator. The Baddies have now created the Non-Split Proposals #59.10.1 and #59.10.2 where the funds ...


6

Yes, Byzantium brings some exciting changes that Smart contract developers should be aware of: REVERT - This new call stops execution of a transaction and reverts all state, but, unlike throw it returns all unused gas. In Solidity, the require method now should use REVERT internally meaning, if you require something and it is not met, state will be ...


6

Constantinople is non-contentious. It wont create 2 forked chains, it's just an upgrade to the mainnet. It was however delayed yesterday, and will likely be postponed around a month.


5

Morden is the public testnet for the Ethereum protocol. It's always had testnet Ether (ETHT or ETT if one wants to give it a symbol?). Unless the ETC blockchain changes its protocol (for example removing or adding EVM opcodes), all ETC development can be tested on Morden. The hardfork between ETH and ETC did not change anything about the Ethereum protocol....


5

If you open the document you will find the answer. If block.number >= HOMESTEAD_FORK_BLKNUM (eg. 100,000,000 (NOT YET SET IN STONE!) on livenet and Morden At this moment it's simply not decided yet. Edit, this has been confirmed now. The Homestead block will be 1.150.000 for the main network which means the Homestead transition will be roughly ...


5

In the future there will be move to a proof of stake algorithm called Casper, which will require a hard fork because such changes are not backwards compatible. There has already been a hard fork: Homestead. Several consensus rules were changed, such as adding the DELEGATECALL opcode and increasing the price of gas for creating contracts via transactions ...


5

A hardfork is a situation where by consensus the ethereum peers agree to change the blockchain protocol spec as of a certain block number. The Homestead release has been hardcoded into the current ethereum clients to occur at block number 1,150,000. Nodes need to be upgraded to the latest release in order to continue functioning correctly after the ...


5

Summary The Ethereum node client software was updated to make the following changes to hard-fork the block chain in block #1,920,000 by applying the following additional block processing rules: Mark block #1,920,000 with the extra data dao-hard-fork (Hex:0x64616f2d686172642d666f726b). Add the ether balance for all DAO accounts to the refund contract ...


5

Yes, they are indeed available now in Solidity as opcodes in assembly, along with CREATE2, and you are free to use them. However, for the time-being they will just fail with "invalid opcode" if any pre-Metropolis EVM tries to execute them - i.e. any node on the current main net. I think the intent here is to allow for pre-release testing of Metropolis using ...


4

Homestead will begin at block 1,150,000 which will happen at midday on pi day. Switching to homestead can be done by updating your ethereum client to a version which contains the homestead changes. geth 1.3.5 cpp-ethereum 1.2.1 parity 0.9.1


4

You won't need to "hold" or do anything special, as long as you're running a recently upgraded client that is Homestead ready (geth>1.3.5). As soon as we hit block number 1,150,000 the new protocol should become active, and we will be on the Homestead chain. As the end user, you should theoretically not be affected. If you are accepting Ether as payment, I ...


4

I think it remains good practice to check any contract before running it. The contract seems to be at: https://github.com/BitySA/whetcwithdraw/blob/master/whetcwithdraw.sol Is there a way to check that the contract at the address 0x9f5304da62a5408416ea58a17a92611019bd5ce3 is indeed coming from the source above? In order to verify that the contract ...


4

A hard fork is necessary to improve the pricing of the opcodes. Here you will find an explanation from Vitalik about the EIP150 Wherein he rebalances gas costs to resolve remaining DoS issues. Recently gavin wood has called for a hardfork to fix the problem. He said: “We need to revise our gas costs, surely. Doing it quickly isn’t an option.” but I ...


3

You are correct. In fact, you could use it as a method to split.


3

I am led to believe that Poloniex (who have listed both ETC and ETH) are replaying transactions intentionally so as to aid the technologically 'less well informed' in getting both balances on their platform. @Nick Johnson mentioned (somewhere) that people might be also inadvertently replaying transactions. It is not necessarily an 'attack' per se. ...


3

A hard fork needs every node of the network to „vote“ for it whereas a soft fork only needs the support of the majority of the miners. Nodes that don’t agree with the hard fork kind of leave the main chain and build a second chain. So it finnaly depends on the majority of nodes, which will be the actual main chain. So as a hard fork needs all members of the ...


3

The short and precise definition is provided by BIP 123: Hard Forks In a hard fork, structures that were invalid under the old rules become valid under the new rules. Soft Forks In a soft fork, some structures that were valid under the old rules are no longer valid under the new rules. Structures that were invalid under the old rules ...


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