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Yes. Once the transaction is mined, click on the block number you can see in the tx details to access the block details. The address of the miner is indicated in "Mined by".


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No, it cannot. Miners will look at each individual transaction and decide whether or not that single transaction is profitable for them to include in a block. Future transactions don't affect current ones.


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Because you just approved your tokens. You didn't send them, you just approved the contract or address to use those tokens whenever it wants. Create another transaction with the actual transfer.


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Out of gas refers to the gas limit, not the gas price. When a transaction runs out of gas, the total gas required for the transaction is higher than the specified gas limit. All transactions have a base fee of 21,000 units of gas, and any extra computation on top of that (e.g. interacting with a contract), uses more gas. Usually wallets can estimate how much ...


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Your gas limit is too low. Retry the transaction with a gas limit of 6 million. The transaction will only use the required gas without consuming it all


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The fee you pay when sending ether to multiple transactions is about the same you'd pay if you sent them separately. The gas calculations are pretty much the same if I'm not mistaken.


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How can I send ether to multiple addresses in one transaction in order to pay transaction-fee once? By aggregating several transfers in a contract constructor, and then deploying that contract. For example: pragma solidity 0.6.12; contract Payer { constructor(address payable[] memory clients, uint256[] memory amounts) public payable { uint256 ...


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Executing the transactions is a trivial task compared to solving the mining puzzle. So I'd imagine it happens like this typically: miner checks the available transactions, orders them by their gas price (highest first) and starst executing them. When the miner has executed enough transactions that the block is full he/she includes those transactions to the ...


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I would guess: % of Last 200 Blocks Accepting: Percentage how many blocks have been accepted (valid blocks) of the last 200 blocks % of total transactions mined in last 200 blocks: Percentage how many transactions have been mined in the last 200 blocks, out of all the seen transactions. So how many of the txs have been added to a valid block #Tx at/above in ...


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Ethereum 2.0 is starting out with the beacon chain: What is the difference between Ethereum 2.0 and the beacon chain? You cannot make a transaction or run smart contracts on the beacon chain. So gas doesn't apply. In the future, when there are "eth2" smart contracts, there will be gas as @Zakoff and others have explained.


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"Dropped & Replaced" means the transaction has been replaced by a new one and the new one has been validated by the network (more info here : https://info.etherscan.com/transaction-dropped-replaced/). Ethereum is effectively currently overloaded and the average gas price is very high (see here : https://ethgasstation.info/). My guess is that ...


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How can I minimize the gas fees when using metamask? It is possible to set custom gas fees when sending a transaction with Metamask (see here : https://metamask.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360015488771-How-to-Adjust-Gas-Price-and-Gas-Limit-). The Ethereum network is currently overloaded and the consequence is a higher gas cost. You can see the average gas ...


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There are a few different scenarios how a transaction can "fail" - depending on what you mean with "fails to complete". The given gas price is too low. In this case the transaction will simply wait until someone agrees to mine it - it might take an hour or a year, depending on when it becomes profitable for a miner to include the ...


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Yes, the gasUsed on the transaction receipt is the true gas used by the transaction. The only (reasonable) way to get get used is to read the receipt. Other, not ideal ways to do so are to (a) read all the OPCODES from the tx and add up their costs, or (b) read the gas used in the total block and subtract the gasUsed of all the other transactions in the ...


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The idea of "gasless" transactions is that a user signs a message, and sends that message to a gas relayer. The relayer is a separate entity, which collects the messages from the users, and sends the transactions. This way, the user doesn't need to pay for the transaction, only the relayer does. Then, optionally, the user can pay in tokens or other ...


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My understanding is that currently you could do that. It would require to be patient to be able to send your transaction because the moment when you are lucky enough to mine a block is not predictable. But with enough hashpower you could try and expect your transaction do be mined. I looked at some node code and I can't see anything preventing this. It did ...


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Can it be called with a small amount of gas despite it uses much? No, gas is refunded at the end of transaction execution. If the transaction runs out of gas before that, the transaction is reverted, and no gas will be refunded. You always need to provide enough gas for transaction execution, without any gas refunds. Can such a function be called by a user ...


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Both the order of transactions between different accounts and the fact if a transaction is even included, are decided by the miner. The miner could even decide to include a lower gasPrice insted of a higher one. The only limitation, as explained in the first post you refered, is that transactions from the same account are processed in nonce order.


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