5

60k - 80k pending transactions sounds like a normal situation and does not seem extensive. Currently, Ethereum does ~750k transactions daily. Assuming all transactions are processed at the same rate, the content of the pool is swapped in every 2.5 hours. However, my guess is that automated services send very low fee transactions that are not critical. ...


4

I think your situation is pretty similar, so you may try a method described in this article: https://medium.com/mycrypto/operation-cryptokitty-rescue-93fd8e00e4f8


4

How can I minimize the gas fees when using metamask? It is possible to set custom gas fees when sending a transaction with Metamask (see here : https://metamask.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/360015488771-How-to-Adjust-Gas-Price-and-Gas-Limit-). The Ethereum network is currently overloaded and the consequence is a higher gas cost. You can see the average gas ...


4

Gas will never be free. It has a purpose and that is to create a cost for a computation. If there was no cost for computation it would be possible to do infinite loops (with each loop being free) that would cause problems for the miners and system.


4

EIP-1884 changed the cost of an SLOAD from 200 to 800, which explains why you are seeing exactly 600 more than expected. It looks like the yellow paper has not been updated to reflect this change. Edit: I have opened a PR on the yellow paper repository to resolve this issue.


3

Short answer: It is approproximately the sum of the cost of executing all called functions plus the cost of executing the wrapper which includes small gas expenditures to pack and unpack function arguments. Better answer: The cost difference isn't serious. The decision should probably be based on your intended flow and other factors. For example, if you need ...


3

As it sounds you do not need to interact with hashes from smart contracts, you could do something simpler. Ethereum blockchain that is designed for transfer-of-value is not good for store-of-hashes use case. Collect hashes to a single file Publish this file in a decentralised storage network like Storj, Sia or FileCoin Storj Tartigrade cost is $0.0045 per ...


3

My recommendation: Configure gas-price according to user-input, allowing for the current price as default (you'll need to implement function scan): async function getGasPrice(web3) { while (true) { const nodeGasPrice = await web3.eth.getGasPrice(); const userGasPrice = await scan(`Enter gas-price or leave empty to use ${nodeGasPrice}: `); ...


3

First of all, you don't need to add the gas-price into your computation. This factor is chosen by you (the transaction sender), so there are no questions about it. The only part in question is the 64244 gas units used in the transaction. According to the white-paper, you have determined that it should be 21000 + 68 * 7 = 21476: 21000: Paid for every ...


2

Your calculations are correct. gasUsed = 68988 gasPrice = 11.1 gwei totalCost = gasUsed x gasPrice = 765,766.8 gwei Considering that 1 ether is 1,000,000,000 gwei and as of 2020-04-12 22:40 UTC 1 ether = 162 USD, then we have 1,000,000,000 gwei are valued 162 USD 765,766.8 gwei are valued 162 USD * 765,766.8 gwei / (1,000,000,000 gwei) = 0.1240542216 USD.


2

transaction fee is constant, and it just changes (decreases) if you are not in hurry and can wait for the network to be a little less crowded (some wallets have this option, not all of them). but if you want to send/receive in the exact time the next block is mined, then you have to pay the constant miner fee, which is different for each crypto. and you have ...


2

With gas price of 129 gWei and gas limit of almost 1 million the numbers you stated are correct. You can try the calculations yourself at https://ethgasstation.info/calculatorTxV.php . Note that the gas limit is only the upper limit to how much gas the transaction is allowed to spend: it does not necessarily mean that the transaction uses that much gas, but ...


2

Gas prices rise based on people trying to outbid each other to make transactions faster. There is no direct tie to eth price, but it is typical to see more congestion when eth prices are higher, because there is more interest in the eth market. If congestion in the network (ie number of people trying to make transactions) is constant and people are not ...


2

You should send your transaction with safe gas price. Here is my code how I am getting gas price: async function getCurrentGasPrices() { let response = await axios.get('https://ethgasstation.info/json/ethgasAPI.json'); let prices = { low: response.data.safeLow/10, medium: response.data.average/10, high: response.data.fast/10 }; return ...


2

Maybe it is because in Coinbase's web interface when an exchange executes, in reality, there is no interaction at all with related blockchains. the onsite exchange is just happening on Coinbase's database, while withdrawals are the ones that are really being processed on the related blockchain.


1

Ether gas fees are subjected to change based on the network usage, a simple ETH transfer based on the current gas price is about 0.0021 ETH which corresponds to 3$. So these prices are high simply because the network usage is also high, having zero fees has the issue that you are subject to anyone spamming the network since there is no fee. At the moment ...


1

Assuming the network has the same level of congestion a transaction when ETH price is $1200 will use the same amount of Ether as the same transaction when ETH price is $1500. In your case, that means that waiting for the ETH price to dip would have no effect as you would end up with the same amount of Ether in the destination account. In terms of the dollar ...


1

When you send a transaction, it gets relayed to all nodes in the network and it is waiting to be included in a block. This list of pending transaction is called mempool. Since all the transactions are relayed to all nodes, they are all public and visible for everyone. That means that anyone wanting to, can immediately react to any new transactions. So, for ...


1

I don't think there is a shortcut. If you want to convert asset A to asset B the cheapest option is usually to convert it directly. Layer 2 is not meant for trying to save gas fees on Layer 1. Layer 2 is mostly meant for recurring transactions. You still need at least Layer 1 transactions: entering Layer 2 and exiting Layer 2. So that's already double the ...


1

Although I was unable to deploy/migrate via Truffle/Infura with plenty ETH, the contract was finally deployed/migrated via Remix/Metamask by setting GAS LIMIT=800000 and VALUE=0 at a non-peak time. See https://etherscan.io/tx/0xde603058609d800d0ee2ccc5cf4cfa086a7161a25b9ce774cabae52a7514282c


1

It's impossible to say. If you look at the chart at https://etherscan.io/chart/gasprice you can see that basically every day there are transactions mined which have a very low gas price (even much lower that yours). But it's impossible to know whether such transactions have been paid in some other means - for example someone offers some monetary payment to ...


1

If an event is indexed it means it can be (easily) searched for: What does the indexed keyword do? . All events are stored in the transaction (and therefore, in the blockchain) regardless if it's indexed or not. Emitting events is the about the cheapest way to store data in the blockchain. Here are some fast-googled calculations: https://www.reddit.com/r/...


1

Following the comments to your question, here is a working example (tested with web3.js v1.2.1): async function run() const web3 = new Web3(YOUR_NODE_URL); const contract = new web3.eth.Contract(YOUR_CONTRACT_ABI, YOUR_CONTRACT_ADDR); const account1 = web3.eth.accounts.privateKeyToAccount(ACCOUNT1_PRIVATE_KEY); const account2 = web3.eth....


1

Transactions have a gas limit and a gas price field. If your transaction is running out of gas, you need to increase the gas limit field, not the gas price field. The amount of gas consumed by a transaction can vary based on which code executes and how much data is written to or removed from the blockchain. You can find the details in the yellow paper, but ...


1

Your concept of "speed" is a bit wrong. Transactions which utilize less gas are not faster. Assuming that your transaction fits inside a block the only thing which affects the transaction speed is the gas price. The size of the transaction mostly does not affect the speed. Miners mostly order the transactions they take in their blocks by their gas ...


1

I don't think number division is very expensive in Solidity, but not sure. Depending on your needs, I would be probably more worried about the precision: as there are no floating point numbers in Solidity a division is bound to lose some precision. In any case, if at all possible, do it off-chain. Basically you should always do everything off-chain unless ...


1

If the average gas price and the transaction flux stay as high as it is since a few months, it is very unlikely. If you want to replace your transaction you can send a new transaction with the same nonce and a gas price much higher.


1

Since ether on the ropsten network virtually isn't worth anything, does the gas price for transactions affect the priority in which they're mined? Ropsten ether may be worthless in "the real world" (for example, if you ever try to convert it to dollars), but in the perspective of the Ropsten network participants, it is just as worth as it is on any other ...


1

But the fee is always gas price * gas limit No it's not. The fee is gas price * gas, where gas is the actual amount used during the transaction. Nevertheless, the amount of gas in your account prior to executing the transaction must be equal to or larger than gas price * gas limit, and not just equal to or larger than gas price * gas (see more details ...


1

Well it's not forbidden. If you think of it it kinda makes sense that a lot of 0-gas transactions are in a single block: a single miner (or a mining pool) for some reason includes lots of 0-gas transactions in the blocks he tries to mine. When he finally succeeds in mining a block all of those transactions finally go through. I'm not sure if you can find ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible