39

Hosted Main Chain Explorers: https://ethtools.com/mainnet/chain Can explore: Contract Addresses Non Contract Addresses Transactions (and their internal steps) Blocks Contract Code https://www.etherchain.org Can explore: Contract Addresses Non Contract Addresses Transactions Blocks Contract Code https://live.ether.camp Can explore: Contract Addresses ...


16

I don't know of any block explorer source code / application you can deploy into your private network. Here's my scripts to check and print blocks, uncles and transactions that can be used to explore blocks in your private network. I've listed them separately for easier reading. If you intend to use it in geth, you would probably want to concatenate the ...


16

Etherscan adds them on a case-by-case (manual) basis for now. You can add a comment to the address and then contact them asking for it to be added. However, I'm not sure if there is some sort of "importance" threshold you must meet. The initial names that were added were things like Poloneix and Kraken, as it helped users immensely to be able to see that ...


11

How about using Etherscan's Event Log API? https://api.etherscan.io/api?module=logs&action=getLogs &fromBlock=0 &toBlock=latest &address=[Token Contract Address] &topic0=0xddf252ad1be2c89b69c2b068fc378daa952ba7f163c4a11628f55a4df523b3ef &topic1=[From Address, padded to 32 bytes - optional] &topic2=[To ...


9

Use web3.eth.getBlock with web3.eth.blockNumber for (var i=0; i < 10; i++) { console.log(web3.eth.getBlock(web3.eth.blockNumber - i)); } EDIT: for web3.js 1.0+ the loop's body should be: web3.eth.getBlock(web3.eth.blockNumber - i).then(console.log) (example)


7

How does EtherScan know I am sending to a Shapeshift/Poloniex wallet? The short answer is that the From: and To: wallet (also known as account or address) details are sent along with the transaction throughout the Ethereum network and EtherScan has a tap (node) into the network. The long answer follows: Any computer that wants to receive or send ...


7

There is no Web API, but you can perform this using SQL. You can do it simply with "Presto Ethereum Connector" (https://github.com/xiaoyao1991/presto-ethereum) Using Presto Ethereum, you can query the blocks using an SQL command. You can base the where condition on block_timestamp. Bellow is the structure of the "block" table provided by Presto Ethereum: ...


6

There is two open source explorer projects, you could use in your private chain : https://github.com/etherparty/explorer https://github.com/maran/ethereum-blockchain-explorer


5

etherchain.org now shows a chart of the average number of transactions per second during a given day. At the time of writing the peak was on the 6th of February 2016 with a 1.2 average transactions per second during the day. The indicator is calculated by dividing the total number of transactions on a given day by the number of seconds in a day (86400).


5

Depending on your Ethereum Wallet version, the compiler version is different as well. For the latest ones, you should select this version on Etherscan : v0.2.1-2016-01-30


5

You have an updated list from this question: Hosted Main Chain Explorers: https://www.etherchain.org ----------------------------- Can explore: Contract Addresses Non Contract Addresses Transactions Blocks Contract Code https://live.ether.camp -------------------------- Can explore: Contract Addresses Non ...


5

Did this account generate Ether out of thin air? No. Ethereum isn't broken, and neither are ENS or Etherscan. Although Etherscan could be clearer about what's happening here. So how do you get the real balance? If you click into the most recent transaction issued by the account (the one with 0 outbound value), you see this: Sorry it's awkwardly clipped. ...


5

It's not a complete answer, but... It's not showing up in EtherScan, but the parent hash that they all share (0xd4e56740f876aef8c010b86a40d5f56745a118d0906a34e69aec8c0db1cb8fa3) is the hash of block 0. Block 0 wasn't "mined" in the typical sense (I can't remember how they did it), so the uncles could be something to do with the consensus algorithms trying ...


4

When you are seeing the name next to the address, it is a manual process of associating a text string with that address. It's that simple. They have a metadata field that they can add to any address. This process is not via an API or across the entire Ethereum network. Each blockchain explorer (etherscan, etherchain, and live.ether.camp) do it differently ...


4

There are a few issues with the accepted answer: as @Lam-Le mentions, .getBlock() and .getBlockNumber() are both asynchronous so if a new block is created during the loop not only will you no longer obtain the 'latest' blocks but you will also have duplicates. the loop creates an disproportionate amount of network request (2 x i+1). To solve the first ...


4

What you are looking for is a open node. I'm not sure where you could find one, however there probably is a open node somewhere. You could scrape etherchain for data, or connect it to for example geth.exe


4

Your transaction will appear on etherscan once you withdraw your ethers (or DAO) tokens are withdrawn from Poloniex. The transaction will be from Poloniex's Ethereum account into your Ethereum account. Prior to your withdrawal, your ethers (or DAO) are stored as entries in Poloniex's internal database. When your withdraw from Poloniex, you will have to ...


4

Currently online (as of 26th April 2017): http://gastracker.io/ https://etcplanet.org/ Currently unreachable: https://etherx.com/ (as of 26th April 2017) https://etherhub.io/ (as of 21st Jan 2018) https://etcchain.com/explorer (as of 21st Jan 2018)


4

If you're interested in just a relatively small subset of popular ERC20 tokens, then looping over them might be okay. But if you want everything, I think your best bet is to process the logs as you go and look for Transfer(address,address,uint256) events. For each event, if the source looks like an ERC20 token (e.g. has name/symbol/decimals), do some ...


3

Here are some places you can find the information you are looking for: https://etherchain.org/contracts - a bit harder to calculate as you will have to navigate through the many pages. https://etherscan.io/accounts/c - currently shows a total of 19,806 accounts. https://live.ether.camp/contracts - this site has a smaller subset of contract accounts listed. ...


3

I believe Etherchain is processing the blockchain as it evolves, and they're creating their own database which is far better at searching and reporting. Anybody can do this, you just need to read through the blockchain yourself and save the data that interests you. Note that reading the entire chain is slow. You will want to keep your database updated in ...


3

Yes you can if you know the address. Just use any of the blockexplorers such as : Etherscan.io, Etherchain.org or Live.ether.camp. You can see past transactions and the internal contract invocations. This gives you a good indication of "activity". For more information on block explorers see What Ethereum blockchain explorers exist?


3

https://infura.io/ is another one that provides a regular Ethereum JSON-RPC endpoint as well as an IPFS gateway.


3

Yeah there are some, i found https://www.etherchain.org/apidoc https://atmospherejs.com/ethereum http://blockapps.net/apidocs My understanding is that, we can create a node on our own and access the node with web3.js so that we can reduce latency issues.


3

Not sure what could have gone wrong. Are you connected to the network? Are you fully synced (if you are not fully synced your sender account might have the wrong nonce)?


3

EDIT: The blockchain explorer below is unfortunately dead. So far no blockchain explorer has shown contract state as clearly. The ether.camp blockchain explorer allows some of this. Go to https://live.ether.camp and then click on "Smart Contracts." Developers have to upload their source code to ether.camp, because raw code on the blockchain are just EVM ...


3

it isn't a bug the balance is returned in weis not in The Ethers. chek one of many conversion tools: https://etherconverter.online/ 268705.32703842675 Ether = 268705327038426745609145 wei the "," is used to separate three digits (look at the amount in $).


3

!!Please note that this solution only works if external node and the main server is in the same Network Domain!! Insecure approach: The problem was: how I start my RPC. Run geth on the main server as follows: > admin.startRPC("0.0.0.0", 8545, "*") true or --rpc --rpcport 8545 --rpcaddr 0.0.0.0 --rpccorsdomain "*" --rpcapi "eth,web3" Update ...


3

As suggested by @smarx, I went ahead and tested the efficiency of simply looping over a subset of ERC20 contracts with a balanceOf method and here are the results: Median response time for number of token contracts using the Infura RPC (this includes getting the token symbol, balance and decimals) 1 = 0.6s 10 = 0.8s 50 = 1.2s 100 = 1.5s 200 = 2s 300 = 2.5s ...


3

I wrote about this issue here: https://medium.com/@tjayrush/how-many-tokens-do-you-have-eae7233676f1. Summary it’s as difficult as you think it might be. If you really want every token that your address holds, you have to spin through every transaction.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible