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Logs are included in the transaction receipt. Unless you use some wrapper around the contract to get the logs they will be encoded. Then you will have to use something like web3.api.abi.decodeLog.


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Running this (using web3.js v1.x): const Web3 = require("web3"); console.log(Web3.utils.keccak256("Transfer(address,address,uint256)")); Gives this: 0xddf252ad1be2c89b69c2b068fc378daa952ba7f163c4a11628f55a4df523b3ef


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When you deploy a contract with Remix (and any client capable of deploying a contract) you need to give the contract the required constructor arguments. In your case the required arguments are: uint256 initialSupply, string tokenName, uint8 decimalUnits, string tokenSymbol These values can be given only when deploying the contract and therefore only once. ...


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60k - 80k pending transactions sounds like a normal situation and does not seem extensive. Currently, Ethereum does ~750k transactions daily. Assuming all transactions are processed at the same rate, the content of the pool is swapped in every 2.5 hours. However, my guess is that automated services send very low fee transactions that are not critical. ...


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"Writing to contracts" is a somewhat confusing term from Etherscan. It is doing a transaction to a smart contract address and function. If look Web3.py examples the example that calls the function setVar() is writing to the contract. import sys import time import pprint from web3.providers.eth_tester import EthereumTesterProvider from web3 import Web3 ...


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That page only tracks the status of names in the auction that took place during that time. If you want information about the current registry, you can check it here here.


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Etherscan has a bytecode decompiler to turn bytecode into more human readable code. While it is still experimental, depending on the analysis you are doing this might give you some more data. Edit: Scanning github repos is a good way too. Check out this report by Electric Capital: https://www.electriccapital.com/electric-research We fingerprinted 27,000+ ...


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After poking around blockscout per Ismael's suggestion, I found that the transaction I was looking for was available, so blockscout is definitely a viable option if you don't want to resort to iterating over all transactions. However, I found that Etherscan provided the same information and I just completely missed it. For future readers, this curl got me ...


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