6

I was so kind to verify the contract source for you. This is a very common problem I also experienced. (It's extremely frustrating) Compiling: Single-File-Solidity Compiler Version: 0.4.24 Contract-Code: Copy the Coin.sol file Optimization: YES !!!!!!! (most likely you were missing that) Here is the link of your verified contract: https://etherscan.io/...


6

Guys I really hate my life. It took me over 10 hours to find the solution to this problem. I compiled the contract with various different methods. Deployment worked with each of the but the contract couldn't be verified nontheless. After a while I figured out that I didn't set the optimisation checkbox on etherscan to "yes". I was compiling optimized all ...


6

When you sync your node, It fetches data previously written on the Blockchain. Hypothetically, let's say that: Node is currently syncing and had fetched the 100 first blocks the first time your account was transferred some tokens were at the block 1000 In this scenario, at that precise point, if your node is still syncing, it won't have enough data to say ...


5

There is more to this than the question suggests so I'll just focus on the prose part of the question. Comments are not compiled into contracts, therefore there will be no record of them in the bytecode. You can, however, create a convincing record of the document contents and acceptance by the parties. Put the legal prose in a document such as a PDF and ...


5

I deployed the contract on the Kovan test net. Deployment versions same as you. Everything worked properly. I see no reason for it not to work on Ropsten. How did you deploy the contract? Maybe share the address to I can try to verify it.


5

Etherscan is the most cut-and-dry, but there are at least a couple of other resources available: SmartContract.Codes - a p2p search engine for smart contract source code. ethPM - a decentralized package manager used to distribute EVM smart contracts and projects. I'm a big fan of ethPM, but it can take a bit of time to understand. Here are a few more links ...


5

60k - 80k pending transactions sounds like a normal situation and does not seem extensive. Currently, Ethereum does ~750k transactions daily. Assuming all transactions are processed at the same rate, the content of the pool is swapped in every 2.5 hours. However, my guess is that automated services send very low fee transactions that are not critical. ...


4

There is no way to cancel the transaction (even if you know the tx hash) It is most likely pending for a long time, because of the low gas price. It might take you a few days until your transaction gets through. If you know your transaction's gas price is under 3 it takes a long time. For current gas prices see here: https://www.ethgasstation.info/


4

That's because they are not the same thing. When you execute the getCode(...) function, you get the deployed bytecode of a specific address, as the docs says. The bytecode on the blockchain is the result of the execution of the compiled bytecode of your contract, which includes initialization code. About the contract you provide, which is verified: await ...


3

Those are predeployment suggestions to reduce ambiguity at this step. The issue is there no way to be certain how the bytecode was generated because the pragma allows flexibility. If possible, examine the tools you used to compile, e.g. solc, Remix or truffle-config.js to work out the compiler version that must have been used. If you cannot do that, then ...


3

You can do this by querying the blockchain directly instead of using your web scraper. For this, you would need to run a node and check each block's transactions to see if the associated addresses are contracts.


3

There's no way for you to get them back, tokens sent to that particular contract that you're referring to, are stuck there forever. The contract that you link to has no way to withdraw tokens mistakenly sent to it. Perhaps your best chance is to reach out to the MWAT team and explain your situation, perhaps they can try to resolve it in someway.


3

All transaction in a specific block were executed at the same time. Therefore transactionTime = blockTime. I hope this makes sense.


3

All multisig addresses in Ethereum are contracts.


3

Etherscan is a closed source block explorer so we can speculate only about their behavior. From WETH contract no transfer event is generated when minting new tokens. function deposit() public payable { balanceOf[msg.sender] += msg.value; Deposit(msg.sender, msg.value); // <--- Desposit event it is not Transfer } From the ERC20 specs there's no ...


3

Each transactions includes a transaction nonce - an incremental number. Miners include transactions in a block so that they order by nonce and transaction price (exact implementations vary). But they have to choose some order: all transactions are always executed one after the other, no parallelism. Here's some more info about the ordering: What is the ...


3

I'm considering now using etherscan site Net Internal Transactions, I might resort to webscraping with beautifulsoup, but I don't know if anyone knows of a better alternative with python based api that does this (takes in a hash, returns internal transactions) that interacts with either etherscan/infura... You should definitely consider using Etherscan ...


3

Why there are some contract addresses that do not have contract source code? Because the source code of a deployed contract becomes available on etherscan only after its author has verified it on etherscan.


3

Most (if not all) of the wallets you mentioned are non-custodial, meaning that they do not control your funds. If a service were to go down, you can simply go to another and use your private key there. Funds are stored on the blockchain directly, not on the service itself. This is different from custodial wallets or services (e.g. Coinbase). Those services ...


2

I found it. According to https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum/issues/16408 I had to pass {"tracer":"callTracer"} to debug_traceTransaction


2

You need to verify and publish your smart contract code in order for Etherscan to pick up the event names.


2

You got the function selector right (0x2f0c92d3), but you failed to correctly ABI encode the address parameter. It should be left-padded with zeros so that it's 32 bytes wide. Try this instead: 0x2f0c92d3000000000000000000000000dc1f5d644e4016f3da89fe002f63fbeb8e071cf1


2

The problem with tokens is that they can be implemented in a million different ways and still be standard compliant. Also as a partial result of that problem, it's very difficult to say whether a contract is a token contract or not - and different platforms estimate the correctness differently. Let's have a look at the ERC721 standard: http://erc721.org/ . ...


2

There are essentially four modes of operation for geth: light - in this mode, you sync next to no data locally, instead relying on other full nodes that have agreed to server light peers. It's more or less a proxy node. fast - this is the default, and you download the current state data without downloading the full block history - once you sync to the ...


2

After poking around blockscout per Ismael's suggestion, I found that the transaction I was looking for was available, so blockscout is definitely a viable option if you don't want to resort to iterating over all transactions. However, I found that Etherscan provided the same information and I just completely missed it. For future readers, this curl got me ...


2

It's an inconsistency of the different client implementations. go-ethereum (geth) uses the string execution reverted (source) OpenEthereum (fomerly parity) uses the string Reverted (source) The revert error message is returned when execution has been reverted with the REVERT opcode, so they are the exact same.


2

When you mint the tokens in the constructor, you don't emit a Transfer event. So Etherscan doesn't know about the minting. constructor() public{ balances[msg.sender] = totalSupply_; } If you are creating ERC20 tokens you may want to look at the OpenZeppelin Contracts implementation to see if this meets your needs. See the documentation for ...


2

Token transfers The challenge with token transfers is that you can't detect them by monitoring the "receiving" address. Tokens are not explicitly transferred to an address - they are only assigned to an address inside the token contract. So whenever someone transfers tokens to address A he actually sends a transaction to the token contract at ...


1

If you only need this for development purposes, you can likely just use your laptop / desktop. Here's a tutorial for setting up your own private network creating two local nodes on the same computer. (if you want PoW just select ethash when using puppeth) https://hackernoon.com/setup-your-own-private-proof-of-authority-ethereum-network-with-geth-...


1

rinkeby is a public test network. If you type geth help, you'll see a number of public networks you can connect to, such as rinkeby, ropsten, goerli public test networks. If you don't specify a network, geth will connect to the public main net. You can check the Private Network Tutorial to see how to set up and connect to a private network.


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