8

Your friend simply edited the HTML and changed the TimeStamp, To, and Value on that page. You can tell this because all of the other stats on the page are correct, with the exception of the items noted above. This includes the Block. You know that the image has been edited because the Block and the timestamp simply do not match (nor are they even close). ...


7

Here is the reply I got from Kaven @Etherscan, in case it's useful for somebody else: Contract that gets the “Similar Match” annotation has the identical contract code (exact bytecode) with another contract (address provided) that has been deployed on the blockchain. The “Similar Match” annotation does not takes constructor argument into account. ...


7

Only one of these addresses has outgoing transactions: 0x7cB57B5A97eAbe94205C07890BE4c1aD31E486A8, all the rest has only incoming ones. So only one addresses is definitely owned by somebody, and all the rest are most probably dead addresses, i.e. addresses no one knows private keys for. You may send ether to arbitrary address, such as ...


6

Guys I really hate my life. It took me over 10 hours to find the solution to this problem. I compiled the contract with various different methods. Deployment worked with each of the but the contract couldn't be verified nontheless. After a while I figured out that I didn't set the optimisation checkbox on etherscan to "yes". I was compiling optimized all ...


6

I was so kind to verify the contract source for you. This is a very common problem I also experienced. (It's extremely frustrating) Compiling: Single-File-Solidity Compiler Version: 0.4.24 Contract-Code: Copy the Coin.sol file Optimization: YES !!!!!!! (most likely you were missing that) Here is the link of your verified contract: https://etherscan.io/...


5

Per the ERC20 standard, newly created ERC20 tokens are sent from 0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000 to the address they are meant to be sent to. It was done as a way of logging and to avoid creating tokens out of nothing. Update The ERC20 standard does not actually define that the tokens are sent from 0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000. ...


5

I deployed the contract on the Kovan test net. Deployment versions same as you. Everything worked properly. I see no reason for it not to work on Ropsten. How did you deploy the contract? Maybe share the address to I can try to verify it.


4

There is no way to cancel the transaction (even if you know the tx hash) It is most likely pending for a long time, because of the low gas price. It might take you a few days until your transaction gets through. If you know your transaction's gas price is under 3 it takes a long time. For current gas prices see here: https://www.ethgasstation.info/


3

Everything in the blockchain is public information. Therefore you can't directly hide it. That being said, you can send your Ether balance to multiple wallets. That way your one wallet will not display your "full" balance. But, as the transactions are also public, anyone can see that Ether was sent away from one wallet and into another and if they want, ...


3

The source code is indeed missing as etherscan cannot link it easily. If you switch to OPCODE View, you're going to find the following: PUSH20 0x273930d21e01ee25e4c219b63259d214872220a2 PUSH2 0x235a GAS SUB CALLCODE Judging by the time the contract was deployed and the code it's using ( CALLCODE ) we can determine that it's actually delegating it's ...


3

Etherscan API allows getting the internal transaction by address. The description of the tool can be found here: https://etherscan.io/apis#accounts and an example is this: https://api.etherscan.io/api?module=account&action=txlist&address=0xddbd2b932c763ba5b1b7ae3b362eac3e8d40121a&startblock=0&endblock=99999999&page=1&offset=10&...


3

It's a smart contract. Smart contracts can only send ETH by using 'internal transactions'. On Etherscan, they don't appear on the 'Transactions' tab. You can see them on the 'Internal Txns' tab.


3

There is nothing wrong. When you do your first token transfer it will automatically be visible.


3

I'm pretty sure that your suggestion is correct. The contract was deployed in tx with hash 0xd47b26a4bb5cacb3792f2d849ef298295af62fcf5943cfc5e987b0c7c798f162 The 0x607108c4... cotract creator is 0x584b3fb1..., because inside this contract new was called. And the external accout called 0x584b3fb1... contract to create the tx. So, it is to address that ...


3

All transaction in a specific block were executed at the same time. Therefore transactionTime = blockTime. I hope this makes sense.


3

There's no way for you to get them back, tokens sent to that particular contract that you're referring to, are stuck there forever. The contract that you link to has no way to withdraw tokens mistakenly sent to it. Perhaps your best chance is to reach out to the MWAT team and explain your situation, perhaps they can try to resolve it in someway.


3

You can do this by querying the blockchain directly instead of using your web scraper. For this, you would need to run a node and check each block's transactions to see if the associated addresses are contracts.


2

I can't speak to this specific chart but if you fast sync a Geth node the final result does include the state. So, I assume that this chart does include the state. It only includes the most recent state though.


2

Technically speaking, there's nothing you can do. The code is immutable and it will stay like that forever. Socially, there's a lot which can be done. In most cases, a comment should be enough, indeed. However, if you reckon that's a high-volume contract with many daily active users, contact Etherscan, MetaMask and alert the Reddit community. If it's more ...


2

If you are looking for an alternative of throw, you can use revert in the similar way. The revert function can be used to flag an error and revert the current call. As stated in solidity docs : Note There used to be a keyword called throw with the same semantics as revert() which was deprecated in version 0.4.13 and removed in version 0.5.0. ...


2

The number of requests per second is limited to 5 request per second. There is not paid service yet. The Etherscan Ethereum Developer APIs are provided as a community service and without warranty, so please just use what you need and no more. They support both GET/POST requests and a rate limit of 5 requests/sec. To use the API service please ...


2

Partial answer. From the code, in receipt.go, the only allowed values are 0 and 1, denoting failure and success respectively. const ( // ReceiptStatusFailed is the status code of a transaction if execution failed. ReceiptStatusFailed = uint64(0) // ReceiptStatusSuccessful is the status code of a transaction if execution succeeded. ...


2

The payable modifier for address types is not available in Solidity until 0.5.0. Either remove the payable modifier, or upgrade your contracts to use Solidity v0.5.0.


2

Each transaction has always the two following fields: from account to account The web3 library provides a function called web3.eth.getCode to retrieve the smart contract code at a given address. If the code returned is 0x, we can deduce that this is a individual account. web3.eth.getCode("0x7f6eab1759ab5cae0ba484422406736a884a140d", function(err,res) { ...


2

To obtain the bytecode of a contract you have to call web3.eth.getCode. An example from the linked page var code = web3.eth.getCode("0xd5677cf67b5aa051bb40496e68ad359eb97cfbf8"); console.log(code); // "0x600160008035811a818181146012578301005b601b6001356025565b8060005260206000f25b600060078202905091905056"


2

You need to use callback for getBalance function. kindly read Document . web3.eth.getBalance('0x742d35Cc6634C0532925a3b844Bc454e4438f44e',function(error,result){ if(error){ console.log(error) } else{ console.log(result) } })


2

How they exactly affect the source code verification? If you pass to Etherscan different parameters than the ones you've used when you compiled the contract and deployed it, then the verification might fail because those different parameters might lead Etherscan compilation to generate a different byte-code than the byte-code that your compilation has ...


2

First of all you should never reveal your private key to the public under any circumstances. I would advise you to create new public/private key pair and transfer all your tokens there. To answer your question, you should search by your public address on etherscan.io And then refer to the section that looks like this: This should have a list of all the ...


2

The ABI standard defines how arguments are encoded and functions are accessed in function calls on smart contracts. The ABI standard dictates that the the constructor arguments are put on the end of the contract creation code. If you look at the init field (etherscan calls it Input Data Field in the link below) of the contract creation transaction, you will ...


2

it gave me a 403 error 403 sounds like didn't pass the apiKey correctly. UPDATE: from your comment above it seems to be a quota issue. But I need transactions for specific time periods only. With ethscan api you can do interval halving to find the start/end block with your matching timestamps. Or you could use something like https://eth.events. They ...


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