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I don't know if the process to verify has changed, but you need to send your ICON image by e-mail. To do this you’ll need to go to the Etherscan Contact Us Page and send them an e-mail with the following information: Firstly, check that your token contract source code has been verified. 1. Contract Address: 2. Official Site URL: 3. Link to download a ...


13

Internal transactions, despite the name (which isn't part of the yellowpaper; it's a convention people have settled on) aren't actual transactions, and aren't included directly in the blockchain; they're value transfers that were initiated by executing a contract. Check these answers as well TheDAO internal transactions How to get contract internal ...


11

How about using Etherscan's Event Log API? https://api.etherscan.io/api?module=logs&action=getLogs &fromBlock=0 &toBlock=latest &address=[Token Contract Address] &topic0=0xddf252ad1be2c89b69c2b068fc378daa952ba7f163c4a11628f55a4df523b3ef &topic1=[From Address, padded to 32 bytes - optional] &topic2=[To ...


11

Mainly due to optimizations carried out when the source code is compiled it's not feasible to get the source code from the bytecode/opcode itself. Refer this question. Compilation back to the original source code is impossible because all variable names, type names and even function names are removed. It might be technically possible to arrive at some ...


10

In the Ethereum protocol there's only transactions and message calls. A transaction is a type of message call. A transaction may perform other message calls, but these are not transactions (even though blockchain explorers may label them inaccurately as "internal transactions"). These (internal) message calls are not published on the blockchain. To try ...


9

An internal transaction is not a real transaction - it has no signature and is not included in the blockchain. It is the result of a contract initiating a value transfer, or calling another contract, typically using the CALL opcode.


9

Currently etherscan does not support verification of multifile contracts. But there is discussion on etherscan's reddit about this issue. Concatenating files into one worked some time ago, but since version 0.4.7 Solidity includes hash of contract's metadata at the end of compiled contract. As this metadata contains file names and hashes, you may get the ...


9

It is not possible as on 24th March 2018. Etherscan is unable to locate contract code on the address of subcontract. Here is the transaction which deploys two contracts. But for the second contract, etherscan is unable to find contract code. The second contract does exist and this was verified by using "at address" feature of remix. Until there are some ...


8

I'm running Truffle 3.4.11 and running just: truffle version gives me the Solidity version as well: truffle version Truffle v3.4.11 (core: 3.4.11) Solidity v0.4.15 (solc-js)


8

It verifies that the bytecode of the smart contract which is stored in the Ethereum network corresponds to the Solidity code initially available only to the smart contract developer. Etherescan will compile the Solidity code and check that the resulting bytecode exactly matches the bytecode stored in the Ethereum network. People reading the smart contract ...


8

Your friend simply edited the HTML and changed the TimeStamp, To, and Value on that page. You can tell this because all of the other stats on the page are correct, with the exception of the items noted above. This includes the Block. You know that the image has been edited because the Block and the timestamp simply do not match (nor are they even close). ...


7

How does EtherScan know I am sending to a Shapeshift/Poloniex wallet? The short answer is that the From: and To: wallet (also known as account or address) details are sent along with the transaction throughout the Ethereum network and EtherScan has a tap (node) into the network. The long answer follows: Any computer that wants to receive or send ...


7

My understanding is that your understanding is correct, except you're missing one particular property of the Ethereum node software. Namely, as part of #3, the transaction is stored in the node's transaction pool (cf. Bitcoin's mempool). Normally, the transactions live there until mined, but because computers have finite memory and processing power, the ...


7

Etherscan's FAQ page answers your first question in the "Token Tracker Listings" section. Here is what it says: Any compatible ERC20 tokens on the Ethereum blockchain can be publicly and transparently tracked via https://etherscan.io/token-search In addition to the above ERC20 token tracker, we also have a selected list of tokens at https://...


7

Here is the reply I got from Kaven @Etherscan, in case it's useful for somebody else: Contract that gets the “Similar Match” annotation has the identical contract code (exact bytecode) with another contract (address provided) that has been deployed on the blockchain. The “Similar Match” annotation does not takes constructor argument into account. ...


7

Only one of these addresses has outgoing transactions: 0x7cB57B5A97eAbe94205C07890BE4c1aD31E486A8, all the rest has only incoming ones. So only one addresses is definitely owned by somebody, and all the rest are most probably dead addresses, i.e. addresses no one knows private keys for. You may send ether to arbitrary address, such as ...


6

If you want to do analytics, the trick is scrapping the whole blockchain into an indexed database. My advice is that you get a SQL database, and write a program that queries a node for its blocks, one by one, then you get the transactions and the transactions receipts, which you can query again for more data. Is up to you which fields interest you the most, ...


6

I don't think so. If you could, then anyone could come along, copy the source code, and reverify it with completely different comments, which opens up for all types of attacks, including phishing. You could possibly contact Etherscan directly and they might let you replace the code if you can prove that you're the creator of the contract.


6

Guys I really hate my life. It took me over 10 hours to find the solution to this problem. I compiled the contract with various different methods. Deployment worked with each of the but the contract couldn't be verified nontheless. After a while I figured out that I didn't set the optimisation checkbox on etherscan to "yes". I was compiling optimized all ...


6

I was so kind to verify the contract source for you. This is a very common problem I also experienced. (It's extremely frustrating) Compiling: Single-File-Solidity Compiler Version: 0.4.24 Contract-Code: Copy the Coin.sol file Optimization: YES !!!!!!! (most likely you were missing that) Here is the link of your verified contract: https://etherscan.io/...


5

Depending on your Ethereum Wallet version, the compiler version is different as well. For the latest ones, you should select this version on Etherscan : v0.2.1-2016-01-30


5

I managed to find a hacky way of doing this. Note - I was looking for more than just the version of solc. I was looking for the actual build of the compiler that solc was using (ie the commit used, night build number etc) so that I could could select it on EtherScan. I have truffle installed globally so I ran which truffle which allowed me to eventually ...


5

Did this account generate Ether out of thin air? No. Ethereum isn't broken, and neither are ENS or Etherscan. Although Etherscan could be clearer about what's happening here. So how do you get the real balance? If you click into the most recent transaction issued by the account (the one with 0 outbound value), you see this: Sorry it's awkwardly clipped. ...


5

As previously mentioned it doesn't appear possible using etherscan. But it's possible using the (free) ethexplorer.io API. The format is: http://api.ethplorer.io/getAddressInfo/[YOUR_ADDRESS]?apiKey=freekey For example: http://api.ethplorer.io/getAddressInfo/0x32Be343B94f860124dC4fEe278FDCBD38C102D88?apiKey=freekey API documentation is here: https://...


5

Its very simple follow steps as I mentioned below. Verify your source code, then follow next steps. Click below link https://etherscan.io/contactus Select dropdown Update token information Fill details and submit form.


5

This was already answered in the comments to your own previous question To summarize: The transaction that created the contract is visible on Etherscan (example here) The input data to that transaction, which is mostly the compiled bytecode of the contract itself, also contains the constructor parameter values in the last bytes (32 bytes per parameter) ...


5

Create a struct like so: struct User { uint256 id; bytes32 name; // other stuff bool set; // This boolean is used to differentiate between unset and zero struct values } And create a mapping: mapping(address => User) public users; You could also use other values as index, but this is just for demonstration. Now, to create a user, use ...


5

Yes, Etherscan.io creates a centralized database which represents the past and present state of the Ethereum blockchain. However, given any specific piece of data from Etherscan, it should be very trivial and quick to verify that data using an Ethereum node directly. I think it is important to remember that not everything can be 'replaced' by a blockchain. ...


5

In a transaction receipt the fied topics correspond to your event arguments which are indexed in your smart contract. For all events you will find as first argument the hash of the event name, and then the data which are indexed in hexabytes. So in your case, in topics you will find 'topics':[hash_event_name,// w3.sha3(text='myEvent(uint256)').hex() where ...


5

Nonce is the number of transactions the source account has made so far starting from 0, not from 1, position is the number of this transaction (mined) inside the block.


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