3

Have you assigned your object this.contract? With the file (or object) that have properties: endpoint, abi, address? Thats what it's unable to find.


3

I added a window.location.reload() after successful transaction (my web3 await function). This works on local test net but will have to do some more digging due to the longer wait times on the Main Net and other Test Nets. ** EDIT ** Thanks @JaxCoder, This helped me find the solution. window.location.reload() was part of it. To make sure the loader / ...


2

Ethereum uses keccak256 instead of sha256 for signing, so signatures generated by SHA256withECDSA cannot be verified by the EVM.


2

Yes and no. Ethereum wallets are more versatile what you seem to have. MetaMask predates Web3authn, so it has the first mover advantage. The different "wallet providers" provide different ways to connect a wallet and sigh the transaction. For example, WalletConnect wallets connect by a scanning a QR code and you sign the transaction using a mobile push ...


2

No, I don't know how you imagined this, but as long as a user has the private key the ETH still on the account Nothing can stop him from spending his ETH. So whatever you do, locking ETH can only happen if ETH is transferred, be it to an escrow contract or maybe an off-chain multisig EOA.


2

Take a look at Trust's wallet-core, it's a cross chain and cross platform library mainly written in cpp. These 2 tests should meet your needs: https://github.com/trustwallet/wallet-core/blob/master/tests/Ethereum/TWAnySignerTests.cpp#L43 https://github.com/trustwallet/wallet-core/blob/master/tests/Ethereum/SignerTests.cpp#L40


2

Before Metamask v7, the wallet extension was sharing the user selected address with every opened tabs. That means, any websites opened through these tabs could possibly track the user's transactions history and the amount of ethers/tokens held by the wallet. A malicious website could simulate the Metamask behavior by sending the user fake pop-up/...


2

Here is what I think that you should do (using web3.js v1.2): const Web3 = require("web3"); // enter your node address and private key below, for example: const NODE_ADDRESS = "https://mainnet.infura.io/v3/12345678123456781234567812345678"; const PRIVATE_KEY = "0x1234567812345678123456781234567812345678123456781234567812345678"...


2

Just to clear up the non-speculative parts of your question: ...there is no actual decentralized application that you can install and run,... Of the listed wallets, MyCrypto and MyEtherWallet certainly have standalone, non-browser, non-browser-extension packages that you can download and run offline (air-gapped, if you wish), and which will generate you a ...


2

It's really cool how this is still an issue almost 3 years later.


2

The article you linked is more than two years old!! It made references to web3 previous version v0.20. With web3 v1.2 there were several changes. For signing you can choose between: web3.eth.sign(dataToSign, address [, callback]) leverages account managment on web3 provider, for example Metamask. web3.eth.accounts.sign(data, privateKey) in case you have ...


1

getTransactionFromAddress() works as intended, but you need to wait for the async function to resolve when you are logging the result. You can do this with: getTransactionFromAddress('0x88a7EF2F047F8b07c6C917a6FD1A13438E9d8424').then((res) => { console.log(res); // do whatever you want with the response })


1

It depends on what you do with this information. All information on Ethereum network is public. Any information coming from the client cannot be trusted unless it is signed with a private key If you use this to authenticate against a private server-side database it is not secure All transactions are signed by the wallet any case and then are authenticated ...


1

var cashoutYo = jsApp.... is asynchronous, so try await. Even so, it doesn't return what you expect. You will get a transaction hash for the transaction that was sent to the network - not the result after the network mines it because you have to wait for that. Have a look at this for the stages you might be interested in and a convenient way to wait for them:...


1

I'm having your same problem to get coin on rinkeby by faucet. I couldn't obtain it. Can someone help me? Could someone send me (as much as u can) some coin? My public key: 0x4e6bCeF79A19747ddc22597dA1BE1D21f0ffd529 Thanks


1

You are basically just generating a low entropy keypair. There is hard no requirement of 12 or 24 words. More info here (word count is not part of the spec).


1

TL;DR: If you want to get your setup to work as it currently is, you will need to call the approve function of your deployed ERC20 contract from the msg.sender account displayed above, with the contract address of what you have deployed as the spender (you will also need to set the owner in the constructor), however, it would probably be better to mint the ...


1

In Ethereum you pay for each byte sent - whether it's to a smart contract or to an EOA (externally owned address). With smart contracts you also pay for the execution (and for the initial contract deployment). I would say this depends on what you want to do with the data. IF you simply send a transaction with arbitrary data to any address it's possible but ...


1

Since the transaction reverted, no ETH was sent. The only ETH you lost was the transaction fee. If your wallet is appearing to be missing funds, you'll have to contact the developer and/or maintainer (Metamask, exchange, etc.) of your wallet as it likely has a UI bug.


1

According to this Guessing private keys The the odds of guessing a randomly generated Ethereum private key is 1 in 115 quattuorvigintillion. (Or, as a fraction: 1/2^256.) That denominator is very roughly around the number of atoms in the universe. (if you have 12-word mnemonic, the fraction is 1/2^128) So this means the probabilty of guessing a private key ...


1

No, they use a different algorithms to generate addresses. No, you cannot use a bitcoin address to receive ethers, or any other cryptocurrency. Yes, there are "Hierarchical Deterministic Wallets". For Ethereum see this: How are ethereum addresses generated?


1

When you start geth node, by default it connects to mainnet. If you want to setup a private network, you should set --networkId to some random number and should not belong to any existing network. You can refer to following tutorial for setting up a private network. https://medium.com/coinmonks/ethereum-setting-up-a-private-blockchain-67bbb96cf4f1 You can ...


1

Most of the dApps are fully open source, due to their nature of transparent development on Github. dApps have links to respective Github organisations on their homepages. You can find dApps for example here: https://walletconnect.org/apps And here: https://defipulse.com/ If you want to weed out a particular example check e.g. Uniswap and Aave: https://...


1

I wouldn't critique style and formatting too much as this is your first effort. It looks like it should work but you have to send from the owner account, but you don't set the owner, so it is still 0x0. Do address public owner; So you can inspect it, to confirm. The usual way to set the owner is the constructor. constructor() public { owner = msg....


1

Private keys are derived from the mnemonic phrase directly, so if you use a different mnemonic phrase (different words), you'll get different private keys, and thus addresses. The best way to approach this is to generate a new mnemonic phrase and move (send) all funds from the old addresses to the new ones. They should generate the new phrase themselves, so ...


1

All transactions in the Ethereum blockchain require some Ether to pay for the transaction. So you simply need to have Ethers in your wallet to pay for the transaction (its gas costs).


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