New answers tagged

1

You can do a get query through axios, which can fetch the ABI directly: rpcEndpoint = `...`; addressURL = `...`; const axios = require("axios"); const Web3 = require("web3"); var web3 = new Web3(new Web3.providers.HttpProvider(rpcEndpoint)); async function main() { url = `http://api-kovan.etherscan.io/api?module=contract&...


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I've been hacked for 30k too. I had a virus in my computer that was here way before I started using Metamask. *which I've got while surfing the dark web. The lesson I've learned: DO NOT use Metamask if you don't have a reliable (paid) antivirus. It's the digital age, people. Don't be cheap like me and get the antivirus software.


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You should be able to recover access to your Coinbase wallet through your Coinbase account. Try contacting them via email!


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Since you are talking about a wallet, you can't attach on-chain functionality to it. It has to happen off-chain. So some off-chain service has to monitor your wallet for deposits and transfer any deposit to another address. This of course also means that the service has to have your private key in order to create transactions from the wallet. No, I don't ...


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You have sent your funds from Binance to your wallet that is correct but you have selected Binance Smart Chain at the time of withdrawal so now if you switch your network to BSC you will see your funds and if you want to withdraw the funds from BSC to Ethereum then you can use https://www.binance.org/en/bridge.


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I was sending 25$ of aave and fee is very high (lowest is around 60$ and highest was 121$) so it dont seem right that fees are more than amount you want to send


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You can speed up the transaction and make it go through faster. On MetaMask, click on the transaction that is processing and there will be an option to "Speed up". Click this and it should go through much faster!


1

Seems like you have two problems - the first is ownership verification and the second is trusted exchange. The first is pretty easy to solve with the OpenZeppelin docs for ERC-721. Looks like you're looking for ownerOf(tokenId), which assuming you know the address of the ERC-721 contract and the tokenId should return the address of the owner which you can ...


3

Metamask accounts are not compromised by giving permission to a website. The permission only allows the website to see your public address, not your private key or seed phrase. Typically, your account will be compromised if your seed phrase is stolen or lost. In that case, all the Metamask accounts that you generated with that seed phrase will be compromised....


2

The second way is correct. In Solidity, ** is the exponentiation operator, so 10 ** 18 is the same as 1018. So this: uint256 totalSupply = 10000 * (10 ** uint256(decimals)); Means the total supply will be 10,000 × 1018 tokens. We use 10n because Solidity doesn´t (fully) support decimal numbers, only integers. In wallets, dApps, etc. this number is converted ...


1

You can implement in your code a PAYABLE function that accepts Ether and transfer it to the owner's account function deposit() public payable { require(msg.value > 0); Owner_Address.transfer(msg.value); /* Make your things ;) */ }


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If the transaction's recipient is a contract the Ethereum's rules state its bytecode will be executed, so at least one opcode will be executed. A contract compiled with solidity will make several checks to determine if it is a function call and dispatch it properly. In order to accept ether payments a contract has to implement the receive function (or the ...


1

We could say that you truly own a private key for a particular address. With that private key, you are allowed to sign transactions for that address (such as send Ether). The Ethereum blockchain is simply a record/ledger/database. The database says that each address as a specific balance of Ether. The address that you currently control with the private key ...


2

Firstly, "Ethereum" is the name of the blockchain, and "Ether" is the name of its native currency, used to pay for gas for transactions. You can be said to "own" any ether represented by a non-zero balance of an address for which you know the private key (or a contract address which itself has a similarly defined access to funds,...


1

Yes you correctly understood. Your assets are as safe as your keys or seed phrase. Keep laminated paper copies of your private keys or seed phrase in fireproof safes on multiple locations and you can just HODL until you decide to participate. I personally engraved them by myself on stainless steel, it should last a few centuries if no chlorhydrique acid rain ...


1

If I understand correctly, you want that Bob proves that he is Bob, the owner of the NFT, when he makes a request to your server. The server wants to be sure that the request was sent from Bob and not someone else pretending to be Bob. The answer is yes, you can do this. To prove that he is indeed Bob, Bob should send a transaction to a smart contract that ...


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To know why an error like that is triggered, you have to check the Code of the contract. On etherscan, click on the contract address, and then on the Contract tab (here). Then, ctrl+f the error name. Here we see that this error is triggered by require(totalAmountOut >= minTotalAmountOut, "ERR_LIMIT_OUT"); A quick read of the code tells me that ...


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There are a number of ways to use the command line to send an ETH transaction. Some of them will depend on whether you are running your own node (like using Geth's console). We'll try to detail a few here. Seth For a first recommendation, we'd like to point to Seth by DappTools. If you're used to a Linux-y way of doing things, you'll probably find this tool ...


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You can try using the Ropsten test network you can get as quick as eth into your account. But there is only a limit of 5eths request per 1hr.


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I don't think you want the first four letters (characters). It's fine now, but what would happen if the price dropped to $900 ? Your system would break. What you probably want is to drop the last 5 numbers. And, preferably rounded up (although rounding probably starts to matter only when the price drops to some very low numbers). Since the value is an ...


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Should not pass the ganache account directly. const accounts = await web3.eth.getAccounts(); const newAccount = await web3.eth.personal.newAccount('test'); console.log("newAccount", newAccount); await web3.eth.personal.unlockAccount(newAccount, 'test', 10000); await web3.eth.getBalance(accounts[0], (err, bal) => { console.log("...


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after looking at the transaction on etherscan it appears the gas fee you provided appears to be too low (5GWei). The current state of ethereum is very congested, therefore user's must bid to get their transactions processed. This is done through the setting of the gas price. The higher the gas price the faster your transaction will be included in a new block....


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I voted for Lauri's answer. Just to amplify it, think of the contract as a machine like an ATM or one-arm bandit. It can conceivably do anything it wants with the funds that are inside the machine, including rules such as "A" wins, so "B" pays, but there is nothing it can do to make a player move funds from their wallet to the machine. To ...


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No, that's not possible. When sending a transaction, it is always signed with one private key and that account is then typically also broadcasts the transaction. You can't withdraw funds from another account without using that account's private key for signing an explicit transaction. To accomplish something like what you want, you can have B transfer Ethers ...


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