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I'm having some issue to understand what is happening with my account if somebody can help me out or guide me how to fix it please! So what happened is that after reinstalling my windows on my pc and reinstalling brave and downloading Metamask(directly from Metamask.io) and following the existing account where I added my 24 words recovery phrase, is opening ...


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So now you have something like a += b. This is the same as writing a = a + b, but just a shorthand version. So you are increasing the value of a by the value of b. If you remove + sign it simply becomes a = b, so you set the value of a to be the value of b.


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The first price is given by the rate you will make in Liquidity Pool when is was created. If you create a token and then first make the LP at 100 ETH = 100 TKN then your token will start at 1ETH price. You will need to have both 100ETH and 100TKN in your wallet to create the LP. After that it will follow the market desire. If the people starts to buy TKN, ...


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You'll want to look into Web3. For Python, JS, or C#, there are the Web3.py, Web3.js, and Nethereum libraries respectively. There's a lot to explain here, so it's better you read the documentation of them or watch some tutorials.


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I wrote that contract :-D It's a basic Safemoon fork that includes fixes for all of the issues found in the HashEx and CertiK audits. That plus there's a dev fee feature that taxes individual transactions so devs can earn something without having to do the traditional "team wallet" method of compensation that so many traders are weary of. The whole ...


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A transaction is the cheapest interaction you can have with the Ethereum Blockchain. So it's your only hope to gather fund from multiple wallet.


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USB can easily be scanned by a virus to retrieve data on your USB. Hardware wallet are better because they can't output sensitive data. Cold wallet mean cold so better to use a full offline computer or even old phone. You can add BIP39 to it, and MyEtherWallet to sign transaction. I don't know for cardano though, you can't even generate cardano with Ian ...


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i moved web3 initialization to settings file, now it it's initialize one time and i get the web3-result already for Celery: settings/production.py: from web3 import Web3 from web3.gas_strategies.rpc import rpc_gas_price_strategy from web3.providers.auto import load_provider_from_uri from django.conf import settings from eth_watcher.web3 import ...


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Well.... I fixed my issue. Turns out it was failing because i was using a bytes32 instead of a string for the argument. i cant really explain why this happened incase anyone else can


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Here is your code with some changes that should work. from brownie import ContractA, ContractB , accounts def main(): acct = accounts[0] container = ContractA.deploy({'from': acct}) ContractB.deploy(container.address, {'from': acct})


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What happens if i deploy a contract to an address that already has eth? The ethers will remain on the address and belong to the newly deployed smart contract. So if no function has been implemented to handle these ethers, they will be lost forever. On the other hand, yes, a payable function should be able to transfer them. We can check this on the Ethereum ...


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If Ether was transferred out of your address, there is only two options: You made the transfer yourself thinking that you were doing something else, possibly through a phishing website; or You lost your private key or it was stolen. There are many, many ways to steal or lose a private key and without you giving more details on what you did before the ether ...


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Ethplorer.io provide API call for token holders. But it's limited for top 1000 holders only. https://github.com/EverexIO/Ethplorer/wiki/Ethplorer-API#get-top-token-holders


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The addresses are the same -- 20 bytes of data. What the addresses represent and how they're used differ as described by SteveJaxon


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Usually the lender contract executes a callback after lending the requested assets. It is the callback responsibility to pay the loan and fees. If the callback hasn't returned the loan nor paid the lender fees then the lender contract will revert the call undoing any operations made by the callback. interface IBorrower { function callback() external; } ...


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You can call an external function but it will change msg.sender, also it will be a little more expensive. I'd recommend to use an internal function that can invoke from both fucntions. Something like this: contract A { function buyItem(bytes32 itemId) external payable { doBuyItem(itemId, msg.value); } function buyItems(bytes32[] memory ...


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I contacted Uniswap support on Discord, and they said it's a known issue on testnets due to them using "fake dollar prices", and it can be worked around by enabling Expert Mode, which I did, and it allowed me to 'Swap Anyway'. The issue is described in this GitHub issue - slightly different issue, but same root cause.


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Gas is a very small quantity of ether. False. Gas is an abstract unit of work. Each EVM opcode has an associated gas cost, which reflects the amount of computation required to run it. (See:Is there a table of EVM instructions and their gas costs?) You have a to pay a small amount of ETH - in Gwei (10-9 ETH) - per unit of gas. (The amount that you spend per ...


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Smart contracts are conditional transactions. Alice has initiated a transaction for this transfer, but these five ethers will be credited to bob only when bob completes some task given by Alice. However, in this case, Ethereum blockchain cannot know if the tasks are correctly completed. You would need a real-world dispute manager, who decides if the tasks ...


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There is no general answer to your question. A smart contract can have any number of backdoors. These include "owner only" function. And those are typically limited to the owner which may "renounce" as you mentioned. But if the owner has any other form of undue influence over the smart contract, such as outsided token positions, a ...


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As written, it cannot be done. One of the important paradigm shifts for an experienced developer is the realization that a contract cannot, and will not, ever do something it wasn't programmed to do. There is no admin access, no direct access to the database (or "state"), and no way to repair anything unless it was proactively inserted into the ...


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