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Here's a main part of ERC-721 that is relevant to your app. ERC-721 lets you make a thing and then later come back to quickly find out who owns that thing. ERC-1155 does not support that use case. You are still very early in your design so you probably want to spell out an idea of what you want to try before asking detailed questions. I have a Community ...


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Using 721 or 1155 depends on the type of assets you want to add to your system and the growth you expect for your project. This is: if you're totally sure that you won't need anything else than: Store notes, with links to IPFS. Pay for them using the native token of your blockchain. Then you will be OK with 721. Now, let's think another scenario: You ...


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If you know the address of the account you want to check and a the specific id of the token you can use the balanceOf or ownerOf method of the token standards. For ERC-1155 you would use the following code: const balance = await tokenContract.methods.balanceOf(address, tokenId).call() const hasToken = balance > 0 For ERC-721 you would use the following ...


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Bulk minting ERC-721 is not costly. Although the implementation you are considering might be suboptimal. In fact, the very first ERC-721 NFT, Su Squares, minted 10,000 tokens in one transaction. The Su Squares smart contract is now open source, permissively licensed and is referenced in the ERC-721 document.


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Each token in your ERC-1155 collection will have a unique ID. Could you elaborate more on the problem you're facing? Unless you're talking about nesting fungible or semi-fungible tokens as a 2nd-level structure? For example you can have ERC-1155 collection with IDs = 1, 2, 3 and then under each ID you can have 100 fractions which are fungible tokens ...


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