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12

Instructions for MyCrypto & MyEtherWallet Transferring a Domain (Best Practice) Search for your ENS name on MyCrypto's ENS Page Copy the text to the right of Labelhash __name:. Go to the Contracts page and select ENS - Eth Registrar (Auction) 0x6090a6e47849629b7245dfa1ca21d94cd15878ef from the dropdown menu.  Access and choose the transfer call. Paste ...


11

There could be any number of ERC20 contracts deployed with the name string variable "Golem Network Token." However, each one of these contracts has a unique Ethereum contract address. The ERC20 contract address deployed by Golem is 0xa74476443119A942dE498590Fe1f2454d7D4aC0d. If someone else deployed a clone contract it would have a different address and ...


8

Such a feature (interpreted literally as access to content) is impossible for the same reason as random number generation, generic web access or system time: the VM has to be fully deterministic black box, executing exactly the same way in all nodes processing transactions. However, indirect 'access' will be possible in a similar way to btc relay: Indirect ...


7

The issue is here: var myEntry = Registrar.deployed().entries.call("0x93cdeb708b7545dc668eb9280176169d1c33cfd8ed6f04690a0bcc88a93fc4af") .call() returns a Promise. The Truffle console is "smart" and knows when you write an expression that returns a Promise[1]. When this happens, it will automatically resolve it for you and print out the result, or print ...


7

This article explains why: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/new5k8/why-did-this-company-burn-dollar26m-worth-of-ether But the ENS auctions come with an interesting twist. If you bid on a domain name and lose, all of your ether will be returned to your wallet minus 0.5 percent of your bid value. This 0.5 percent will be transferred to the ...


6

You need to add '0x' to the beginning of the content hash in the setContent function. publicResolver.setContent(namehash('5.test'), '0xf1a669a425b378bd8034fe0df7fea098c8b932a6037b688764afda1e92a8db1e', {from: eth.accounts[0], gas: 100000})


5

I have found the answer. I don't know why it was so difficult as there is a tool that has been developed on the same "ENS.DOMAINS" site, but under MIST there is no link that I could find from the "Registrar.ens.domains" to this tool. Enter this URL into your MIST browser and it lets you create Subdomains: http://manager.ens.domains/ Now I can create the ...


5

Go to the MEW Contracts page and select "ENS Registry" from the dropdown menu. Access and choose the setOwner call. Paste the NameHash (not LabelHash) from EtherScan into the node field. Paste the address of the new owner in owner. setOwner function changes ownership of the name (e.g. the ability to point to a resolver), but not ownership of the deed ...


5

You can do this by subscribing to the AuctionStarted event. Set a filter to iterate over all blocks in the past week for efficiency: ethRegistrar.AuctionStarted( {}, {fromBlock: web3.eth.getBlockNumber('latest') - (60 * 60 * 24 * 7) / 14, toBlock: 'latest'}, function(err, result) { console.log(result.args.hash + " expires " + result.args....


5

Yes a contract can have an ENS address. A well known example is the Ethereum Foundation donation contract, which you can look up with ethereumfoundation.eth. You can see it at: https://etherscan.io/enslookup?q=ethereumfoundation.eth The ENS Ethereum Address for this name is 0xfb6916095ca1df60bb79ce92ce3ea74c37c5d359 Also accessible at ...


4

The database or config file options as suggested by other answers sound fine: even if there was a DNS-esque registry, DApps would initially have to hardcode its address. Your question is timely and the ENS, Ethereum Name Service, was just deployed on the testnet (Ropsten). See the ENS wiki for a quickstart and other details. Here's an introduction: ENS ...


4

The expiration date is when the permanent registrar is expected to be deployed. Once that happens, you have to do a manual transfer to the new registrar. source: reddit


4

The way the name is "hidden" is that it's hashed. That means if two people try to buy the same name, they'll end up in the same auction. If you're trying to buy a name that no one would guess, no one will bid against you. If you're buying something common, like an English word or a DNS domain name, you might find yourself with competition. (People trying to ...


3

The UIs might have bugs that are being fixed. https://gitter.im/ethereum/go-ethereum/name-registry is where questions can be asked and answered in real-time. An alternative way to bid is given in the ENS docs. Make sure to read the docs and below is the given example. Example var bid = ethRegistrar.shaBid(web3.sha3('name'), eth.accounts[0], web3.toWei(1,...


3

Is the name now lost forever? Testnets are only transient. They can be withdrawn - or attacked - at any time, so even if the name isn't lost now, it would have been (will be) at some indefinite time in the future. A couple of further ideas: I haven't kept up with the state of Ropsten after the spam attack earlier in the month, but it's possible that it's ...


3

See here at etherscan https://etherscan.io/ens?filter=auctionskn use "FILTER BY" to show other infos


3

Ideally, you will be interacting with the contract thorough out your application. You can store it in database, locally or even hardcode the address. If you store in db, you can easily deal with future migrations and upgrade of your contract when you want. If the contract deployment is dynamic, you can hook the deploy into a promise and save the address ...


3

You are missing a resolver. On the console, I get: > ens.resolver(namehash('5chdfgh.eth')) "0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000" So you need to do: ens.setResolver(namehash('5chdfgh.eth'), publicResolver.address, {from: eth.accounts[0], gas: 100000}); more info: https://swarm-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/usage.html#setting-up-a-resolver


3

This is a pretty general question for this site, so it might get voted down. It's clear you've done some homework and you're considering how all the parts of an upgradable system of contracts would fit together. Yes. It's a name resolver that could be used to resolve a contract address. That affords developers with the option of appointing new user-...


3

Turns out to be very simple: Visit https://manager.ens.domains/ Search your .eth domain Click the Resolver Details tab Paste your IPFS content hash into the Set Content input Send the transaction out !Be careful: to set the Gas fee, the default is too low


2

If you are in node you might store it in a database like postgres or even create a file for a user to backup. If you're in the browser you have a variety of options ranging from cookies to localStorage to indexedDB. You can even allow users to enter their own contract addresses in, to recover an already deployed contract of known bytecode and ABI.


2

You need to ensure that the information you are sending is exactly the same as the bid, otherwise the connection cannot be made on the blockchain. Please double check: The name you are entering is the same that you bid on. The bid amount is the same as your bid amount when you bid. The secret is the same You are sending from the same account. How to ...


2

During the 48 hour reveal period, make sure to reveal bid using the same arguments (like web3.sha3('mydomain.eth')). You should be the sole winner and will be charged the minimum price of 0.01 ETH but get the rest back when you finalize the auction. You can run all the commands again this time with the correct name.


2

First of all, those red error messages are unrelated. Those are fonts that have failed to load. The ENS registrar dapp has had some bad performance with MetaMask, but MetaMask is pushing a patch to help mitigate the issue later today, so I would recommend trying this again soon. Another way to try sooner: - Change your MetaMask network to another and back ...


2

Yes, and no. To bid on a name you submit the shaBid hash. This contains the name, bid value, sender address, and a salt. It is nigh on impossible to reverse. Your bid is not discernible from this value. If you bid on a name using the newBid method of the registrar contract on a previously started auction (startAuction) it is basically completely anonymous ...


2

Here are the series of steps that worked (after jumping in chat with @atomh33ls). > loadScript('/my/path/to/ensutils-testnet.js'); > testRegistrar.register(web3.sha3('blipblop'), eth.accounts[0], {from: eth.accounts[0]}); // wait for block inclusion... > ens.setResolver(namehash('blipblop.test'), publicResolver....


2

Found it at https://etherscan.io/enslookup This site will give the required hashes needed for sub-domain creation. And the blog http://blog.rudikovac.com/create-an-ens-eth-subdomain/ gives instructions on how to use MEW to create the sub-domains


2

Etherscan tool has a limitation, it always appends the .eth suffix. There is another online tool where you can calculate the namehash of any domain, not only .eth domains: https://swolfeyes.github.io/ethereum-namehash-calculator/


2

It's because it's an existing popular domain name / word: The DApp and the twitter bot have built in lists of common names, drawn from an English dictionary and Alexa’s list of top 1 million internet domain names. They use these lists to show you when common names are being auctioned. We do this because if the app didn’t reveal these names, anyone with a ...


2

Just to add to the previous answer, I believe ENS implements RFC5891 section 4, which has this to say about case sensitivity: Labels MUST be compared using equivalent forms: either both A-label forms or both U-label forms. Because A-labels and U-labels can be transformed into each other without loss of information, these ...


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