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6

There are several bitcoin standards related to creating keys from mnemonic seeds. BIP 39 for making mnemonics to create a seed: https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039.mediawiki BIP 32 for deriving keys from that seed: https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0032.mediawiki However, not all clients use all these standards (eg Electrum'...


5

You can use the ethereumjs-wallet library to create a wallet file from your raw private key, or directly from your Quorum wallet info: var ethJS = require('ethereumjs-wallet'); var thirdparty = require('ethereumjs-wallet/thirdparty'); var wallet = thirdparty.fromQuorumWallet(passphrase, userid); var v3 = toV3(password, [options]);


4

Answer by Vitalik Buterin on reddit: Try: function brainwallet(username, password, hardness) { return web3.sha3(Array(hardness + 1).join(username + ":" + password)); } Set hardness to something reasonably large, at least 2000. Use your usual username for username, even if lots of people know it. These two things together give you a ~20 bit-...


4

Yes, you can simply generate pairs of unencrypted or encrypted private and public keys. For example, use this bulk key generator: 1,"0xb7d3a6d96960c2e9650822be7c1cc4ebe8bb3718","9a130892d949ab5faf678ac6295d3ab05a434448b824c0dc43bf86a4c2bbf747" 2,"0xbf3407c1231b3612dc6d2da07f32208ed1e17ebd","...


2

First, a warning: Brainwallets are intrinsically risky - never make one out of an actual phrase in the english language (or any language for that matter). Phrases from language are much easier to guess than a random list of words from a language, so only use brainwallets that are random lists of words taken from a large pool of potential words (e.g. more ...


2

Here is the ethaddress.org brain wallet. It's not trustworthy but you can clone it on github and run it locally on an offline machine. Which makes it pretty trustless. Here is live.ether.camp (click "get address" button). It's also not trustworthy, but since you asked for multiple alternatives it's worth to add this. These guys are pushing brain wallets ...


2

Since the site dies not appear to accept strings longer than 64 characters, as you said, I would recommend hashing the seed manually using a cryptographic hash, like SHA256. This should return a 64 character hex string that you can then use as the seed. In Linux, for example, you can use the sha256sum command. There should be similar tools for other OS's as ...


1

Here is how to get a useful hash from your seed even if it's too long. You use Keccak-256 hashing algorithm with your seed. The resulting 32byte hash (64 chars [0-9a-f]) is the hash you can use in ether.camp to sign the transactions. Be aware that Keccak-256 is not the same as SHA3. It took some time to figure it out and the info from https://medium.com/@...


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