9

I think it had previously been a part of the "Geth and Tools" release package, but it's gone missing... An issue was raised a couple of days ago: #3703 With regards to what it does, further up the page you linked to there's a description of each of the standalone tools (yes, they're separate executables): bootnode Stripped down version of our ...


5

What am I missing? Please let me know if there is other information I can supply. Thank you. Next time tag your question with parity, to make sure I wont miss it :p Cross-client private networks: The problem Geth is a client written for Ethereum. It was one of the first official reference implementations and was never meant to run anything else but ...


5

yes there is some built-in bootstrap nodes you could check the code in github : Geth : https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum/blob/ff2c966e7f0550f4c0cb2b482d1af3064e6db0fe/params/bootnodes.go // MainnetBootnodes are the enode URLs of the P2P bootstrap nodes running on // the main Ethereum network. var MainnetBootnodes = []string{ // Ethereum ...


4

Well, apparently the reason why the connection is being refused is that "'Connection refused' is ok for the Go bootnode. [as i]t does not accept TCP connections", as suggested by fjl in the go-ethereum issue 380 Discovery uses UDP as protocol. If you want to test if it's working properly, use netcat -u -z -v <PUB-IP> 30301 instead.


3

It turns out something changed with the last versions of the bootnode tool, you need to run wit -v5 flag for ti to work like instructed in the tutorials. I still don't get why it is like that, but running this did the trick and my boot node is working : bootnode -nodekey boot.key -verbosity 9 --addr :30301 -v5


3

Opening geth attach and adding some peers manually solved the problem for me. List of peers- admin.addPeer("enode://0b64924d478abaf6900ffed857dc066b29e6a9498c8a6604a159555bd08fe1ccf3c2cefdbd625b0e7cf93b49c3cc6d6e412a5cde92b4a7d2b8bfd6f10d56511e@136.144.129.222:30303"); admin.addPeer("enode://...


3

Have a look in bootnodes.go. It's still 3 for the Geth clients: // ETH/DEV Go Bootnodes discover.MustParseNode("enode://a979fb575495b8d6db44f750317d0f4622bf4c2aa3365d6af7c284339968eef29b69ad0dce72a4d8db5ebb4968de0e3bec910127f134779fbcb0cb6d3331163c@52.16.188.185:30303"), // IE discover.MustParseNode("enode://...


3

You can do it with using both ways, having the two computers networked together. Using Metamask; select network as Custom RPC put the custom url as http://[ComputerA's ip address]:[rpc port] eg: If computer A's ip address is 192.168.8.100 and rpc port is 8545 then use, http://192.168.8.100:8545 Using web3; As one of your own questions How can I ...


3

bootnode is back in main source of go-ethereum (as of today). If you build from source, it will be available under build and for make you used; make all A network is initialized to a genesis state. All the nodes connected to same bootnode are in fact connected to the same genesis state. In other words as referred from ethereum official docs, Ethereum - ...


2

Prepare your nodekey for each node in advance. It is just a 512-bit random number. Then store them somewhere, along with the public ECDSA keys derived from there. The public keys are the components of the enode you need to establish connections using the --bootnode command option, as well as the admin.addPeer() function in console. Forming the enode is as ...


2

Finally it worked. I still don't really know what did it but I will list here some of the changes that got it to work. When I figure out what exactly did it I will update my answer. Use the --v5disc flag for node discovery. The bootnode took ages to start with the --v5 flag so instead of using a bootnode I chose a random node as bootnode. I started my node ...


2

The RLPx protocol suite consists of at least two protocols: The Kademlia like discovery protocol, that involves UDP packets that are simply signed by the nodes and not encrypted The RLPx/devp2p protocol, that involves encrypted TCP packets. This protocol requires a two-phase handshake. In the first phase the peers exchange the secret used to encrypt the ...


2

I am having a similar issue. I am not overriding the bootnode and therefore I am not using the --nodiscover flag. However, I have 2 nodes -sharing the same genesis file and network id, running on 2 different Virtual Machines but they don't recognize each other as peers. The protocols node from admin.nodeInfo in the geth console is the same on both nodes: ...


2

Generally speaking, the answer is yes, there needs to be some sort of trust in the Ethereum network as a whole, i.e. there are more good people than bad. Yuval Marcus, Ethan Heilman and Sharon Goldberg co-authored a paper on "eclipse attacks": a scenario whereby a set of nefarious nodes corner a well-intended node, giving them the impression that they are ...


2

Yes geth --nodkey=key.txt will (re)generate the same enode url repeatedly as the cli options would suggest. It wasn't working for me due to the unfortunate combination of a typo in my sh script and a bad nodekey file.


1

To run a bootnode, you should increase your --max-peers to something sensible like 1024, make sure port 30303 is open (or whatever your node's network port is) Other than that, that's it. Bootnodes are just normal nodes. It's recommended to have decent hardware though, especially for larger networks.


1

This answer is just a complementary to the answer provided by @Achala Dissanayake, and I'd like to thank him, again! To make two computers on different Internet networks (e.g. Wifi, under a firewall or any combination of setting) connect to a machine A and send transactions/smart contracts to the private chain, in machine A, we can do the following: First,...


1

The section Setting Up Networking here describes how to run a bootstrap node. It looks like you just need to provide the flag --nat with the IP address of the computer/server running the code when you run the geth command. You need to make sure you have the port you are using open appropriately as well. You can then use the geth console geth attach data/...


1

Bootnodes must be identified by an enode. Enodes are derived from private key. Full quote: Each ethereum node, including a bootnode is identified by an enode identifier. These identifiers are derived from a key. Therefore you will need to give the bootnode such key. Source: https://github.com/ethereum/go-ethereum/wiki/Setting-up-private-network-or-...


1

You need to enable UDP rule for port 30310 for ec2 instance running bootnode. Problem while setting private ethereum network on AWS using bootnode


1

What is the correct way to do this and what are the implications of this? You have to update the IP in the chain spec or in your bootnodes configuration. Otherwise, Parity won't know the route over IP to the node. Is it as simple as distributing a new chain specification? Exactly. Would this be considered a fork? No, this only affects the node ...


1

You may produce the enode from nodekey by using option of --writeaddress Refer to how to produce enode from node key?


1

to get the enode address use the -writeaddress command bootnode -nodekeyhex 435601bfc51df236b310517ef2233c046cbede662ed5a3c0de5a37c785350d7f -writeaddress Insert your own bootkey (that was generated) and you should see the enode address display.


1

Bootnodes is a cheap and effective solution to aid the network self-discovery, but they need to catch up with a proper genesis file to isolate your network. When you run geth, the genesis block is recreated from scratch and then it begin to sync with peers at block 1. For you private blockchain, you need to provide this file to all of your nodes so they ...


1

Probably you have already got the answer but since this thread is answerless. So here is your answer. It was a bug in ethereum ci package (check here) and you can install bootnode with following command. sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:ethereum/ethereum sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install bootnode


1

I'm assuming the geth instances on your private testnet are run from the same machine? (As opposed to separate machines with their own VLAN) Adding --nodiscover flag prevents your nodes peering unless done manually, so what was your command for admin.addPeer? It needs to be followed by enode address, ip, and port like so: admin.addPeer("enode://...


1

At least one difference between the two is that the --bootnodes argument sets explicitly the boot node addresses, whereas the static-nodes.json file sets the addresses of static full nodes (peers).


1

Using the option --nodiscover while starting the geth console will prevent handshakes with external nodes. I have tried this and it works. Unfortunately for me, I am still unable to establish a handshake between the two nodes of my private blockchain on AWS.


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