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48

To backup your wallet you will need to make a copy of the key file(s) located in your ethereum directory. Linux: ~/.ethereum/keystore Mac: ~/Library/Ethereum/keystore Windows: %APPDATA%/Ethereum The file should look something like this: UTC--2015-09-18T14-07-57.023663538Z--da78c8721e4ede42cf488304551eb596dd5f93e23 I've suggested just saving the keystore ...


46

How to Access the Files to Back Up Using Mist - Backup Accounts Go to the top bar and select ACCOUNTS -> BACKUP -> ACCOUNTS. This will open a folder. Inside this folder there are keystrore files that have long names starting with UTC--2016-04-14....... Each of these files represent an account. Back up these up. Using Mist - Backup Wallet Contracts Go to ...


31

In Parity 1.6 : Have a look at OSX : ~/Library/Application\ Support/io.parity.ethereum/keys/ Linux : ~/.local/share/io.parity.ethereum/keys/ Windows: %APPDATA%\Parity\Ethereum\keys In Parity 1.5 : Have a look at ~/.parity/keys. You'll find what you're looking for.


18

PLEASE MAKE SURE TO ALSO BACKUP YOUR PASSWORDS Each key file (as described in @Ethan's answer) is encrypted and only usable with the correct password. Another safety tip: Before deleting any key files, after you have done the backup, please try the import/restore process on another system to make sure you can send a small amount of Ether. (To import, copy ...


11

When you run parity -h you can see the default keystore. It is listed as the default where the -d --base-path option is explained, under Operating Options. On Linux: ~/.local/share/io.parity.ethereum/keys/ On Mac OS: ~/Library/Application\ Support/io.parity.ethereum/keys/


9

If you use the latest version of the Mist wallet 0.3.9, then you can backup your wallet with saving the AppData. You can do that by clicking on Backup in the Menu bar and click "Backup App Data" which points you to the installation directory where your wallet is saved. In my case it is located here "C:\Users\Andreas\AppData\Roaming" on Windows 10 - 64 Bit....


7

Backup To backup your accounts from Ethereum Wallet, see How to backup mist wallets?. The files that you need to backup will have names like the following: user@Kumquat:~/.ethereum/keystore$ ls UTC--2016-04-17T01-23-45.279405976Z--aaaaab3ad17cd9aca6fd5343a53a513685c7aaaa UTC--2016-04-17T02-34-56.029466208Z--bbbb8622d70f62f212aef64e7e26e4746dc8bbbb UTC--...


6

Parity stores keys in ~/.local/share/io.parity.ethereum/ for linux. Whereas for Windows, it stored them under C:\Users\{CurrentUser}\.parity\keys. `


5

This is a community wiki of HD wallet implementations for Ethereum. Javascript LightWallet


5

In general, if you carefully generate your keys offline and on an untampered live system, with a strong passphrase, you are good to go. In opposition to any other anwsers recommending cold/offline storage, I suggest strongly not to use offline storage. There are so many popular examples out there where huge amounts of value disappeared from cold storages ...


4

The passphrase mechanism is accurately described in BIP 39 https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/master/bip-0039.mediawiki How Ethereum keys are derived is described here https://github.com/ethereum/EIPs/issues/84 These mechanisms are common for Ethereum and other cryptocurrency wallets.


4

Answer The short answer to your question is yes you can test your keys/wallets on different OS's. Important Note: KEEP MULTIPLE BACKUPS OF YOUR KEYS IN SECURE/SEPARATE PLACES Other Comments If you are intending to only use geth across your various OS's there shouldn't be an issue exporting and importing the keys as you have described. I made the first ...


4

They would have to crack your password to be able to steal your ETH, so it would be as secure as your password is strong. But if a keylogger virus was on the computer logging all your keystrokes, then they could see what your password is. I recommend putting any large amounts of ETH in accounts into cold storage: save the account file inside an encrypted / ...


4

Yes, you can simply generate pairs of unencrypted or encrypted private and public keys. For example, use this bulk key generator: 1,"0xb7d3a6d96960c2e9650822be7c1cc4ebe8bb3718","9a130892d949ab5faf678ac6295d3ab05a434448b824c0dc43bf86a4c2bbf747" 2,"0xbf3407c1231b3612dc6d2da07f32208ed1e17ebd","...


4

When I switched from geth to parity, I noticed that parity imported my accounts from the .ethereum/keystore/* directory into parity somehow. 0 ✓ user@host ~ $ ll ~/.ethereum/keystore/ total 48K 4.0K drwxr-xr-x 2 user users 4.0K May 13 10:36 . 4.0K drwx------ 9 user users 4.0K Jun 17 10:17 .. 4.0K -rw-r--r-- 1 user users 58 May 13 10:36 contract-...


4

According to the documentation for Parity's ethstore key management API: secret store directory: It may be either parity, parity-test, geth, geth-test or a path. default: parity (Also of note is the ethkey key generator API and associated commands.)


3

Bitcoin operates under a UTXO (unspent transaction output) system, which necessitates new addresses for each transaction. Ethereum, in contrast, operates on an account based system. While it would be possible to deterministically generate a tree of accounts from a single seed in Ethereum, there's really no need to, because a single account can handle all of ...


3

I only know the mobile Jaxx app wallet for now that can handle Ethereum HD accounts all linked under a mnemonic. It can also handle bitcoin. It's my favorite wallet app for the moment if you only want to receive and send ether and not interact with contracts. Note that Jaxx is still in beta, so use it with small amounts.


3

BIP32 and BIP39 are describing ways to generate hierarchical deterministic keypairs. In general you generate a deterministic private key first and generate a public key derived from that private key. Ethereum HD wallets pretty much do the same, here are five hex addresses extracted from the javascript LightWallet (HD): ["...


2

Yes, the keystore file is json and contains the encrypted private key. The private key will never change and does not depend on the number of transactions it is involved in. Saving each keystore file and each password is what you need to do for backup. It is also recommended that you test your backup. The name of the file doesn't lead to the private key: ...


2

You are correct. rsync -avzh $HOME/.local/share/io.parity.ethereum/ /path/to/my/backup/parity If you want to export the keys only, they are located in: $HOME/.local/share/io.parity.ethereum/keys And if you want the blockchain or state only, you can directly export it via: parity export blocks /path/to/chain parity export state /path/to/state Hope that ...


2

Yes, as long as everything in the ~/.ethereum folder is transferred, your node should work just fine. You actually don't even need to migrate anything, you can mine from any computer with a synced node just by setting the coinbase to your address. You'd need to resync the node if it's a new computer, though.


2

In Quorum, all the nodes are synced up same way as regular Ethereum would, except the blocks may come in from a leader rather than another node. So, a new node joining the blockchain would sync up as usual by receiving blocks from the current leader + participants. Once it catches up, it will be receiving blocks from the leader. Geth / Quorum allow for a ...


2

If you used the Ethereum geth client, then the key information required to access the accounts was in the folder "keystore". If you have lost this data, then it is impossible to restore access to the accounts.


1

There's no easy way to fix this, and it may be impossible. Ideally you should stop using that machine immediately. At the very least, try not to write anything to the hard drive. The contents of the file you need might still be present on the hard drive in unallocated space. Each new file you or Windows creates might overwrite the data you want. Check out ...


1

What exactly do you mean by "I've earned some ETH after that backup"? That you have received some ether in your account since the last time you backed it up? If so then yes, you will have that ether. The UTC--year-month-day file is called a keystore and contains the private key of your ethereum account, which you could think of kind of like the password to ...


1

Looking at this question from a different perspective... is it less secure to have the key store outside of the C:\Users\$username$ folder? Potentially, yes. Especially if you're using a shared machine used by other people. Your $username$ directory is private to you. Yes, the administrator has access to it, but by moving your keystore you're ...


1

is it less secure to have the key store outside of the C:\Users\$username$ folder? No, it isn't less secure. However If you are keeping your key store on your machine once compromised any location on that machine is no more or less secure. It may be slightly more secure depending on the nature of the attack vector. Though this would only be security through ...


1

Once a file is on your computer, its location doesn't matter, it is nowhere safe. The only security you can have on a wallet that you keep on your computer is to have a strong password. Make it very strong. Anyway I recommend you not to use a critical wallet (one with a lot of ether in it) on a computer that you use to connect to the internet. Have an ...


1

This depends upon the no. of accounts you create/use. Each account will have a unique private key stored in the keystore folder. So, if you are operating with a single account, you need to backup the corresponding private key only once. This key won't change over time. But, if you keep on creating new accounts, new keys will be generated(one for each ...


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