5

You can do this by subscribing to the AuctionStarted event. Set a filter to iterate over all blocks in the past week for efficiency: ethRegistrar.AuctionStarted( {}, {fromBlock: web3.eth.getBlockNumber('latest') - (60 * 60 * 24 * 7) / 14, toBlock: 'latest'}, function(err, result) { console.log(result.args.hash + " expires " + result.args....


3

Is the name now lost forever? Testnets are only transient. They can be withdrawn - or attacked - at any time, so even if the name isn't lost now, it would have been (will be) at some indefinite time in the future. A couple of further ideas: I haven't kept up with the state of Ropsten after the spam attack earlier in the month, but it's possible that it's ...


3

See here at etherscan https://etherscan.io/ens?filter=auctionskn use "FILTER BY" to show other infos


2

Correct. The cut can be zero, but must be specified. The _nftAddress must point to a contract that implements ERC-721 (at least the draft that was in place at the time we published CK). See above. The deployment order is: Deploy the core contract. Deploy the auction contract passing the core contract address as _nftAddress. Call the setSaleAuctionAddress on ...


2

You can use this site enslisting . Search for one of you names, and it will show all the names owned by that address. you have 13233 ENS domains


2

If you search this site there are multiple questions which ask the same thing but from a bit different angle, so I couldn't find an exact duplicate for your questions, although my answer has all the same data as those answers. The transaction order in the block is entirely up to the miner to decide. And because they can decide it, they typically choose an ...


1

It appears you are very early in the design process and are still studying existing solutions. So I'll reply here with just some broad concepts. Good luck on your journey! Fully off-chain This is the approach OpenSea uses. Everybody with a token needs to approve or, more likely, approveForAll their tokens to the OpenSea marketplace contract. Commitments are ...


1

The wrapped ether contract behaves like an ERC-20 contract. So it is possible to call approve on it. With this function, the NFT buyer can allow the auction contract to spend his tokens as per the bid. What the auction contract would do is call the transferFrom function. It would work because the auction contract is approved. If the NFT holder also calls ...


1

My question is: is it possible to pay the execution cost of a SC with the ether stored in the SC itself? Yes. However, this isn't a straightforward thing to do, and will require that the smart contract be written in such a way that miners can be paid directly rather than via the gas costs. Someone with more experience of constructing such transactions would ...


1

everytime it get: "Auction already ended." But, why? The require() statement in the modifier is incorrect. require(block.number > endBlock, "Auction already ended."); ^ ^ ^ ^ +---------- A ---------+ +---------- B ---------+ The require() statement requires that A is true ...


1

They didn't overpay, they paid 207.97 DAI for 1.12 ETH, which is 185.6875 DAI per ETH. Around ~$5 profit per ETH. Not much, but it likely covered the gas costs + a little real profit


1

You are right about the inherent challenge of using a blockchain to attest to something in the physical world. This is sometimes called the onboarding problem. As Jaime pointed out, onboarding problems are often addressed with a witness and some form of certification. A blockchain cannot examine the art or use sorcery to deem it real but it can record that ...


1

When another bidder outbids you, and you have revealed your bid, you are automatically credited your deposit (less a 0.5% fee). This credit does not show up as a transaction in blockchain explorers. Etherscan, for example, shows it as an "internal transaction" because the value is transferred as part of a transaction that your account didn't initiate. As ...


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