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I have just started learning about ethereum and trying to toy around different use-cases.
I tried sending an ethereum to my wallet using ropsten ethereum faucet.
Now, my understanding is this is some kind of a dummy ethereum value and don't hold any monetory value which means I can't sell it.
Then I tried to register ENS Domain using the same ether which I got from faucet and I managed to register it.
Now, I am really confused that how I can register a domain name using a dummy ethereum value(I am assuming my above assumption is correct).
Also, how different transaction networks are different from each other.

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Now, my understanding is this is some kind of a dummy ethereum value and don't hold any monetory value which means I can't sell it.

Correct. Ropsten is a testnet, along with Rinkeby and Kovan. The currencies on these networks are test ETH, which has no real value.

Some people would argue that if you can find someone to buy it, then it has value. However, markets for test ETH don't seem to have materialised. Given that test nets in the past have been short-lived, and given that they're controlled by a smaller set of nodes than the main public network, there would be significant risk in assigning value to test ETH. See: Ropsten testnet is under kind of attack? What can we do?

Then I tried to register ENS Domain using the same ether which I got from faucet and I managed to register it.

You've registered an ENS domain on the Ropsten testnet. This will give you a .test domain name, rather than an .eth name. This is expected: you've used test ETH on the Ropsten testnet to buy a test domain name. This is what the testnets are for :-)

Also, how different transaction networks are different from each other.

See the accepted answer to this previous question for a very detailed comparison: Comparison of the different TestNets

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  • so this testnet domain will only active on my system and no one else on other systems can check it, right? – Beginner May 5 at 19:14
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    Hi again - no, it should be accessible by anyone, but it will only resolve to addresses on Ropsten, not any other network. (So you can't point it at something on the mainnet.) Also note, it'll only last for 28 days, then the registration lapses and you lose ownership. – Richard Horrocks May 6 at 7:51

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