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I am confused as to how a crowdsale works. If in a crowdsale, people give their Ethereum to a new coin to be entered in a smart contract. Doesn't that mean that the receiving end of the contract (once the new coin goes live or whatever) needs to also be an ERC-20 public address?

What if the new target coin you are trying to sell, uses say a whole different protocol running on completely different computers, using the SHA3-512 hashing algorithm to sign keys in a completely different elliptic curve?

What power or validity would the ERC-20 tokens entered in smart contracts have over this new network the tokens are to be exchanged for?

So why then can a coin like Nimiq have a token sale of "NET" (ERC-20) and then later be activated to the final target coin Nimiq, and the NET tokens be left useless on the eth blockchain?

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What power or validity would the ERC-20 tokens entered in smart contracts have over this new network the tokens are to be exchanged for?

They do not.

ERC-20 serves as a tradeable interim token before the real protocol launches.

Conducting token sale using a smart contract only ensures the money is fairly and transparently collected.

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