1

Assume, I've created my own ERC-20 Token and published it to the Ethereum Blockchain. By doing so I also got access to all of the initially created tokens.

If I'd like to distribute them, the only ways i know would be either to:

  • Sell them via an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) or Security Token Offering (STO)
  • Gift them directly / indirectly, also called Airdrops.

Which other ways of distribution are commonly used for ethereum Tokens?

New contributor
The_Holy_One is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
1

I think the ways you mentioned are the most common ones.

Some other ideas/possibilities:

  • Sell them in an open crowdsale contract which is not part of an ICO/STO. The contract might not even have an end date but it may sell tokens indifinitely until no more tokens are for sale - or it keeps minting new ones all the time.

  • Distribute them based on some work/effort. Either for on-chain or off-chain actions. For example bounties or contribution to some on-chain effort.

  • Distribute based on random other criteria. For example whenever thing X (a transaction of another token, Ether transaction to a certain address, other transaction, ...) happens on-chain you send your tokens.

  • Just for clarification, do you mean with open crowdsale contract an Ethereum Contract? If not, what is then the difference to an STO, in case the crowdsale is not unlimited long and don't generate new tokens? – The_Holy_One Jan 11 at 12:30
  • 1
    Yes, an Ethereum contrat. Basically just a regular Crowdsale contract without many of the restrictions. – Lauri Peltonen Jan 11 at 12:41
0
  • Pay bounties men.
  • Pay team(support, devs, co-founders..ex).
  • Partnership (only if your project awesome ).
  • Pay the exchanges.

Your Answer

The_Holy_One is a new contributor. Be nice, and check out our Code of Conduct.

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.