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I've seen that during the course of tutorials I am following, the intructors have gradually shifted over to Visual Studio code rather than use remix. I could not find any such explanation as to why they did that and they haven't contacted me back yet regarding this query so I was wondering why one would opt VSC rather than remix?

Is it solely because of preference or is there any such advantage that VSC has over remix in developing smart contracts using solidity?

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It's not really easy to test you contract code over and over again in Remix. You'd have to fill in all the fields and click the buttons every time to do so. Using an IDE like vscode gives you the advantage that you can automate testing. In bigger projects, this is a huge advantage.

  • I see. So remix is for beginners like me to just get to know solidity coding? – R.D Sep 20 '18 at 8:59
  • Yeah that, and I use it for quick demo scripts for StackExchange – Henk Sep 20 '18 at 9:01
  • Awesome! Thanks for the info. Will accept as soon as the 3 minute timer is over – R.D Sep 20 '18 at 9:01
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Choice of IDE is a trade off between various features provided by different IDEs and what you really liked about a specific IDE, you might come across a feature that you would love it but at same time that's not popular in community. It's your choice I would say.

Coming back to IDEs for Solidity, there is lot happening and numerous improvements in rapid pace, and most of them aren't matured yet so you should keep exploring.

Remix is definitely the best one to start with where there is not much automation which helps individual to understand what's happening behind the scene and later move on to advanced tools (like Truffle ...) to write enterprise grade big Solidity files talking to many other Solidity files where IDEs like vscode , Atom, and tools like truffle are essential and it's quite tedious to carry out these aspects with Remix like IDEs.

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