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Looking for some answers alongside resources that point out those answers Background: I am a intern at a mortgage company and need help regarding a write up with their security concerns

Questions:

  1. If only one Ethereum node is running how can we guarantee security of manipulation of smart contracts and data?

  2. Can smart contracts be manipulated after they are uploaded onto the network?

  3. Can unique account identification hashes be regenerated, and can passwords and private keys be regenerated after the initial creation of an account?

  • Just to clarify something on point 3. Account passwords can be changed on a node, still, if you lose your password/private key, there is no way to get the funds of that account. – Carlos Fuentes Aug 6 '19 at 7:51
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If only one Ethereum node is running how can we guarantee security of manipulation of smart contracts and data?

If this is a node running on the mainnet, it is synced with all others, so they all have the same state. If you have a private Ethereum network you would need more than one node.

Can smart contracts be manipulated after they are uploaded onto the network?

The code cannot be changed, so no. It can however be called at any time. Hacks in smart contracts are executed by calling smart contracts with unexpected parameters. Within a private Ethereum network this is per se not possible since one would assume the network is not accessible from the outside. However an elaborated hack can include entering a private network. So this is not a zero-chance.

Can unique account identification hashes be regenerated, and can passwords and private keys be regenerated after the initial creation of an account?

When using ethereum you can create any amount of keys and ids, it is completely up to you to manage it.

  • Thanks for the response. Can you be a little more specific on the reasons why they would need more than one node if it was a private network. What would one node be capable of doing? – Matt Hess Aug 2 '18 at 18:56
  • That is its nature. A blockchain is a decentralized structure which means it runs on more than one machine at once to ensure consensus. It is a distributed database. If you do not know what this means you should revisit the very very basics of this tech. – mchl18 Aug 2 '18 at 19:00
  • You could add to your answer that smart contract migration could be done if you want to change something in it. It is not technically changing the contract but it is a solution. – Carlos Fuentes Aug 6 '19 at 7:47

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