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  • The blockchain is all about serverless and removing the third party. But I saw many DAPPs accessible through HTTP. Isn't this breaking the serverless concept? I read in a lot of places that IPFS aims to replace HTTP to make the web decentralized.
  • How can browsers like Google Chrome run DAPPs that using protocols such as Whisper?
  • What is the point of Mist Browser if I can access DAAPs through any other browsers(using HTTP)?
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    the whole concept of DAPP is a marketing thing to invite people write apps just like an app for Android. But it is not going to work, Ethereum is just a set of services. Everything will stay like it is, you are going to use Chrome or Android app, with the only difference that it is now going to interact with the blockchain. Forget about the DAPP word, replace it with API word and you will understand it quicker. – Nulik Apr 19 '18 at 18:25
  • Yeah, I see, this explanation makes a lot easier to understand, but I was thinking if the new internet would be a decentralized internet ( like in silicon valley series :D), HTTP will have no place at all and DAAPs should not depend on HTTP. – Maysara Alhindi Apr 19 '18 at 18:44
  • @Mayasara, there can't be internet on the blockchain. First, because there is no capacity to do it, current Ethereum rate is 15 TPS. Second; blockchains do not scale. Third: it is of very high cost, the consensus algorithm in (current) cryptocurrencies is very foolish, it wastes a lot of resources. Centralized servers are a lot cheaper solution. Blockchain is only good for money, but not for everything – Nulik Apr 19 '18 at 19:26
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Not exactly.

If you think of the blockchain as a solution to fault-tolerance and a 1:1 replacement for server-side logic and storage, blockchain will never make sense.

Blockchain solves for trust by presenting inarguable sets of proven facts. In practice, these are generally none of the facts you'll find in existing database designs and none of the logic you'll find in existing software over even familiar software patterns.

It's completely different. It's about proving the important facts.

High-availability is an important requirement simply because so much blockchain projects lean so heavily on the blockchain at the core of the design.

All manner of software stacks are possible on these foundations. These can includes servers talking to contracts, browsers talking to contracts, devices talking to contracts. It's fair to say that those aspects are not fault-tolerant or distributed when they (typically) rely on DNS and web servers to deliver assets.

If a CryptoKitty is born in a contract and there are no people to see how cute it is, is it still there? Yes.

In most cases, temporary localized failures are not a huge concern. In any case, removing the dreaded single-point-of-failure from the edges is arguably a separate concern.

This might be helpful: https://blog.b9lab.com/the-joy-of-minimalism-in-smart-contract-design-2303010c8b09

Hope it helps.

  • Thanks a lot, That was very helpful, But my only problem with DAAPs that are using HTTP protocols and relying on DNS that it may keep the problem of the ability to shut down the servers by the government or whatever, I don't think anyone can shut down the blockchain but its so easy to shut down a particular server. In my point of view, DAAPs should be only stand-alone applications (Desktop applications) or similar that connect and interact with the blockchain, what do you think? – Maysara Alhindi Apr 19 '18 at 18:47
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    If your app can't tolerate a certain failure mode then there is always a way to remove a single point of failure. The price one is willing to pay for different kinds of fault-tolerance depends on the app. It depends on the case. For example, if you are trying to make fault-tolerant S.O.S. signals, then end-point censorship might be a serious concern. If you are primarily concerned with the integrity and availability of an asset registry, then possible temporary unavailability of cute jpeg images may not be a critical fault. – Rob Hitchens - B9lab Apr 19 '18 at 19:34
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  1. Google Chrome can't run DApps (short for Distributed Applications) on its own (atleast at the moment). Google Chrome needs an extension (for eg Metamask) to connect to underlying Ethereum blockchain.
  2. It's extensions like Metamask that allow Chrome to run Dapps that use Whisper protocol.
  3. Mist browser is just another option (apart from Chrome, etc) to be able to run Dapps. It is not mandatory to use Mist browser. One doesn't need to use an "extension" with Mist browser as it is built specifically for handling Dapps on blockchain.
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The problem with 'traditional' HTTP technology and Dapps is that they do not like each other too much. Things are easy if we live in the traditional HTTP world or if we somehow managed to live purely in the Dapp world but unfortunately the Dapp world is not ready for total immersion.

Currently we still need technology which bridges these two worlds together - such as Metamask. Maybe somewhere in the future we only need decentralized solutions, but meanwhile we're stuck with what we have and HTTP is one of the best available means to get users to use Dapps (through Metamask, for example).

If we could connect to the Internet with decentralized means (IPFS maybe?) we could possibly also connect to Dapps without centralized intermediaries.

As already stated, regular browsers can't connect to the blockchain directly.

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The blockchain is all about serverless and removing the third party. But I saw many DAPPs accessible through HTTP. Isn't this breaking the serverless concept? I read in a lot of places that IPFS aims to replace HTTP to make the web decentralized.

In theory and in ways, yes, this breaks the serverless concept. Think about different network layers first, then evaluate the robustness and maturity of technologies associated when them. For example, decentralized apps can still run on TCP/IPC, but are decentralized at the application layer. In the future there may be a decentralized Ethereum-inspired cloud computer, but it will still utilize TCP/IP protocols. Imo IPFS has yet to become widely adopted, but can and still should happen.

How can browsers like Google Chrome run DAPPs that using protocols such as Whisper?

This is why people have created browsers like Brave, or are creating web-based platforms specifically for running Dapps, like Cosmos. Google Chrome needs a bridge as it stands because it isn't natively 'running' a Dapp.

What is the point of Mist Browser if I can access Dapps through any other browsers(using HTTP)?

Mist provides valuable visualization as to what is happening in the Dapp as well as wallets. It provides valuable monitoring and in many ways a testing environment for the Dapp. It is especially powerful to show this to non-technical people, plus it has a great UI. It isn't essential to the Dapp, but makes people's lives much easier, and ultimately promotes widespread adoption quicker.

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