9

Does anyone have data on the typical kWh required to produce 1 ETH?

This answer suggests 13.46 KWh/ETH. It would be useful to find some comparison data.

I'd imagine these values are dependent on hardware, ambient temperature and the characteristics of the blockchain. Have I missed anything? How does the energy use per ETH vary as the Blockchain lengthens?

Does anyone have data on recorded kWh/ETH values, ideally with hardware and ambient temp (mean/var) ?

Out of interest, for BTC, this article suggests 240 kWh/BTC.

EDIT:

Following @NickJohnson's comment, It seems more sensible to ask for typical kWh per hash. I can then use the network hashrate and ether supply to graph kWh/ETH.

Does anyone have data on recorded kWh/hash values, ideally with hardware and ambient temp (mean/var) ?

  • More than anything else, they depend on the hashrate - so any answer is going to be out of date very quickly indeed. – Nick Johnson May 24 '16 at 10:38
  • Thanks @NickJohnson; Perhaps I should be asking for typical kWh per hash. – atomh33ls May 24 '16 at 10:41
  • Yes, that would be a much more stable value! – Nick Johnson May 24 '16 at 10:42
7

I have 60MH/s for 630W power consumption. Let's do math 😉

My cards are 2 Sapphire r9 290x 3Go and one Asus r9 380x 4Go, all with oc.

Temps are 65°C for both 290 and 45°C for the 389x. Difference between the two card models is due to the card but also to their position in my rig. The cooler is on the bottom with a heavy fan close to it.

See console screenshot bellow for details on memory and GPU oc. 380x is a little bit hotter than what I said because of a nice hot day today.

my rig console

  • Is this termux? – Waqar Lim Jun 17 '16 at 11:25
  • Yep. Cool to monitor the miner. – Nicolas Massart Jun 17 '16 at 11:48
5

Q: How does the energy use per ETH vary as the Blockchain lengthens?

The energy use per ETH should theoretically not differ as the blockchain lengthens. The main factor that will affect energy use per ETH is the difficulty.

This difficulty is adjusted so that blocks on the Ethereum blockchain are produced on average every 15 seconds. If more miners mine the Ethereum blockchain, the difficulty will adjust upward so each miner has less chance of mining a block. More information at How is the Mining Difficulty calculated on Ethereum? .

Q: I'd imagine these values are dependent on hardware, ambient temperature and the characteristics of the blockchain. Have I missed anything?

Regarding ambient temperature, your GPU chips should perform the same number of calculations per unit of electricity consumed. The GPU fan however will have to work harder to move the heat away from the GPU chips if the difference between the ambient temperature and your GPU chip's temperature is smaller.

Q: Does anyone have data on the typical kWh required to produce 1 ETH?

Currently my 126 MH/s will mine a block on average every 3.81 days (from https://etherscan.io/ether-mining-calculator). 5 ETH will take 3.81 days x 24 hours / day x 0.680 kW x 2 = 124.36 kWh.

1 ETH will take 24.87 kWh.

Note that Ethereum hashrates are not directly comparable to Bitcoin hashrates as the hashing algorithms used are different.



Stats

I'm running 2 x the rigs listed under My Setup in What's the best Hardware for Mining Ether? . Each of these rigs have 2 x Gigabyte 8GB R9 390X G1 Gaming PCI-E VGA Card GPUs.

Here's the statistics from my monitoring command of my rigs:

00:36:33.202 63.486 MH/s 78C 76C 1150:1150 1150:1150 MHz R solo
00:36:33.613 63.559 MH/s 75C 74C 1150:1150 1150:1150 MHz M solo

The rigs are producing about 63 MH/s each, and the GPU temperatures currently range from 74C to 78C. On warmer days, it ranges between 77C to 84C. My rigs are overclocked to 1150 MHz each.

(Yeah, my rigs run hot as they are enclosed in a case, but it keeps my cat and dog away from the computer parts. I have had to create a script to shut down ethminer when the temperature touches 92C to avoid burnouts.)

My room temperature is comfortable, on the cool side.

And each rig draws around 680 watts.

(And I'm using my rigs to warm my house as it's getting cool in Sydney now.)

  • We will all loose a great heat source when POW will be replaced by POS 😖 – Nicolas Massart May 24 '16 at 15:28
  • Yes. POW is good for winter. But then I won't have to point a fan out my window to extract all the hot air from the room in summer :-) – The Officious BokkyPooBah May 24 '16 at 16:02
  • you should leave in France, I'm happy to have it to heat the house even during summer 😀 – Nicolas Massart May 24 '16 at 17:05
2

In 200 days* mining I generated 428.89 ETH spending around 1058 W (25392 Wh per day) with two (inefficient) mining rigs with 4 GPUs.

So, I spent 25.392kWh per day * 200 days = 5078.400 kWh for 428.89 ETH.

That is 11.841 kWh per ETH for my personal stack. Today it should be much more expensive. *) Started in October 2015.

1

Based on this answer (for Bitcoin):

RPi: 5.2 Wh/GHash

GPU: 0.161 Wh/GHash

Miner: 0.015 Wh/GHash

FantasyRig: 2.77 x 10^-7 Wh/GHash

From the answers here, I calculated:

Nicolas Massart: 2.92 Wh/GHash

BokkyPooBah: 3.00 Wh/GHash

The hashrate at time of writing is 2945 GHash/s (1060200 GHash/hour)

Assuming 3Wh per GHash, then the total power use at present is ~ 3.2 MW.

I can't seem to get raw data for total number of hashes or hashrate.

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