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I am new to Ethereum.

I would like to know

  • How many addresses can you create in an Ethereum wallet (limit)? Meaning is it 1K, 10K or 100K addressees you can create in a Ethereum wallet

  • What is the maximum number of ethers can an Ethereum wallet address hold? Meaning, the total number ether per wallet address is it 1 million, 2 million or 10 million etc.

I am sure there's limit to both addresses that one can generated and the maximum number of ethers an address can hold.

I searched online and didn't find an answer. I would appreciate a detailed answer.

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How many addresses can you create in an Ethereum wallet (limit)? Meaning is it 1K, 10K or 100K addressees you can create in a Ethereum wallet

It depends what you mean by "wallet". If you're really just asking "how many addresses can I create on my machine" (e.g. using the Geth client), the answer is "as many as your hardware allows you to". As in, you're limited only by the speed of your CPU and size of your disks.

There are almost certainly people and organisations out there with very powerful machines frantically generating key pairs (i.e. addresses/accounts) in a bid to steal other people's money. (Or, perhaps less pessimistically, just to prove it's possible to create collisions. See the LBC: Large Bitcoin Collider project.)

What is the maximum number of ethers can an Ethereum wallet address hold? Meaning, the total number ether per wallet address is it 1 million, 2 million or 10 million etc.

There's (practically) no limit. Note that there are only 97.2 million ETH currently in existence. I haven't checked the client code to see what size int it uses to represent an account balance in the state data, but it'll definitely be big enough to hold all the ETH that will ever exist (in a single account).

  • From the Yellow Paper section 4.1 "World State" the balance is serialized as a scalar value P_256, ie balance < 2^256. – Ismael Jan 27 '18 at 3:35
  • Great - thanks Ismael :-) I suppose that makes sense: in Solidity, balance is always a uint256, which matches what you've pointed to in the state data. – Richard Horrocks Jan 27 '18 at 11:29
  • Thanks Richard for your answer. I appreciate it. I get the idea that an address will contain the total number of available ethers (Int variable size) etc and the total addresses that can be generated is dependent on the hardware i.e. CPU and disk space etc. – jamesT Jan 27 '18 at 19:48

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