2

Are the ENS addresses case-sensitive?

Making different example.eth from ExAmple.ETH?

If I'm going to bid on a name I must pay attention on that?

2

Just to add to the previous answer, I believe ENS implements RFC5891 section 4, which has this to say about case sensitivity:

Labels MUST be compared using equivalent forms: either both A-label forms or both U-label forms. Because A-labels and U-labels can be transformed into each other without loss of information, these comparisons are equivalent (however, in practice, comparison of U-labels requires first verifying that they actually are U-labels and not just Unicode strings). A pair of A-labels MUST be compared as case-insensitive ASCII (as with all comparisons of ASCII DNS labels). U-labels MUST be compared as-is, without case folding or other intermediate steps. While it is not necessary to validate labels in order to compare them, successful comparison does not imply validity. In many cases, not limited to comparison, validation may be important for other reasons and SHOULD be performed.

(See comments from EIP-162.)

1

Like DNS, ENS is also case insensitive. i.e, the ENS name are lowercase as in DNS. Thanks

0

EIP-137 is the spec describing ENS. In short, it says that it's possible to register an upper-case name, but no correctly functioning resolver will resolve to that name.

Are the ENS addresses case-sensitive?

Making different example.eth from ExAmple.ETH?

It depends on what layer you're interacting with:

  • If you are using a user-friendly tool, it should handle all this for you. The experience will seem case-insensitive.
  • If you are manually crafting transactions for the network, you need to force the name to lower-case first (as well as make other normalizations).

If I'm going to bid on a name I must pay attention on that?

Probably not, because you should be using friendly tools like MyEtherWallet.

Source

In the "Name Syntax" section of EIP-137, it says:

Each label must be a valid normalised label as described in UTS46 with the options transitional=false and useSTD3AsciiRules=true. For Javascript implementations, a library is available that normalises and checks names.

Note that while upper and lower case letters are allowed in names, the UTS46 normalisation process case-folds labels before hashing them, so two names with different case but identical spelling will produce the same namehash.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.