2

What if I want to launch independent network using Ethereum protocol because current prices are too high for my purposes. Is that possible without forking and maintaining new codebase using geth or eth or ethereumj? What is the best tool for this?

closed as unclear what you're asking by eth, high110, Dawny33, Waqar Lim, Tjaden Hess Jan 24 '16 at 16:15

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • This question could use some elaboration. Not sure what you mean by the 'current prices are too high'? The gas price for compute resources? As long as you provide some gas your transaction should eventually be completed: github.com/ethereum/wiki/wiki/Ethereum-Development-Tutorial#gas – GrokSrc Jan 21 '16 at 17:14
  • You can fork the code and see if someone follows... – Symeof Jan 22 '16 at 0:15
  • @GrokSrc By current prices I mean that there is a network with >500 Gh/s and >1k of nodes. I am asking about a case when my purpose need to: (1) put amounts of data into public blockchain, (2) don't need to process it through such powerful network, (3) is ok if data will be processes through 50 nodes less expensive network and (4) don't need to reinvent a wheel. – 21xhipster Jan 22 '16 at 11:24
  • @Symeof Forking is not an answer. I am following a project since inception and one of Serenity feature is abstraction that is exactly about that. – 21xhipster Jan 22 '16 at 11:24
  • You could edit your question to incorporate the information you gave GrokSrc. (1) it's seldom necessary to lots of data into the public blockchain; instead you should use IPFS and only store the hashes in the blockchain, or even just the root of the merkle tree of your data. For (2) and (3) and (4), it should be solved once the scalability solutions are implemented; but then it really depends how much trust you need and how much you are willing to pay. There are cheaper, more centralized systems for smart contracts. – Symeof Jan 23 '16 at 14:19