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Here is a result I received from scraping pending ETH transactions:

Transaction hash: 0x9e0e02546b56a7ae81803627d0e4124171970d7a1c2da4b2c68022aedd9da6c4

{"method":"swapExactETHForTokens","types":["uint256","address[]","address","uint256"],"inputs":[{"type":"BigNumber","hex":"0x00"},["C02aaA39b223FE8D0A0e5C4F27eAD9083C756Cc2","788F39d599C790a2E7E5CcC6F9bf539063cB339A"],"a473192f3E504DFD792E0aaA94586d7a8093Ba5C",{"type":"BigNumber","hex":"0x01824775c781"}],"names":["amountOutMin","path","to","deadline"]}

I haven't found any sources online or in documentation regarding the amountOutMin variable taking 0.

What I'd like to know is, how does this effect the slippage of the transaction? Will the transaction never revert due to extremely slippage?

Thank you all for your time and help.

1 Answer 1

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Yes it can, and as you already guessed, it's equivalent of allowing up to 100% slippage. Obviously, it's extremely dangerous, since it basically allows you to get frontrunned for the whole value of your transaction, and it's used way too much in smart contracts made by careless developpers.

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  • Thank you, I appreciate your response!
    – Kyle Bayer
    Commented Jul 29, 2022 at 1:41

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