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I want to ask a question. As far as I know, if we capture the majority of the nodes of the blockchain, we can get the control of it. In web3 terminology, our aim is to recover internet from big tech oligopolies like Amazon, Google or any government. But they have a lot of computational power and computers, if they want to capture the blockchain, they can capture in terms of the majority problem. What is your thinkings about it ?

Sorry for my grammatical mistakes, my native language is not English.

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  • What for? If they were doing this it would immediately render all the token valueless and people would fork as soon as they notice it. So no, even with huge computing power, it's not possible. They could try to get undetected but given the amount of people monitoring the chain, I don't see how it could be. Jul 21, 2022 at 12:20
  • In the future, why wont they try this ? I don't understand how could they detect this.
    – H.Okan
    Jul 21, 2022 at 12:26
  • What is the goal of taking over a network? It's to do things that it's not supposed to do. Otherwise just use the network. And if they do things they are not supposed to do, it gets detected. Jul 21, 2022 at 21:06

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If we capture the majority of the nodes of the blockchain we can get the control of it

This isn't quite true. Someone suddenly booting up more Ethereum nodes than currently exist (which frankly would be easy for aws or google) a would have no noticeable ability to exert control over the network. This is because the node I run would still validate everything it heard from the google/aws nodes. They couldn't just lie to me and have me believe them

However, if they manage to capture a majority of the block validation (i.e. get 51% of hashpower currently, or get 51% of validators in the future), which would be much more expensive and more complicated for any group to do, then yes they could mess around with the network. It does not mean that they have ultimate control (i.e. your node will still not allow them to give you invalid blocks)

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