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Other than Oracles writing data into the chain that then can be accessed by all nodes to verify a certain state at a certain time, what other reasons are there for creating transactions without a recipient (no to address)?

https://etherscan.io/address/0x0000000000000000000000000000000000000000

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    Curious. Where did you read a 0x0 is useful for "writing data into the chain that then can be accessed by all nodes to verify a certain state at a certain time" ? – Rob Hitchens Mar 5 '17 at 6:38
  • It's a wild assumption I made after reading that oracles can write to the blockchain and after the first transactions I found that was linked to 0x0 came from an oracle (seen on Etherscan). – migu Mar 5 '17 at 7:41
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A carefully crafted transaction can be sent to (to: null) for contract deployment. I don't know of another valid reason to send data to 0x0. It's possible you found some contract deployment examples, or even failed transactions (errant).

Oracles can write to the blockchain, but they normally do so by calling a contract function (with an address) known as the callback function. That is to say that the Oracle subscriber (contract) will indicate a function designed to receive the response from the Oracle.

Informally, "I want to know question and you can call back to me at myAddress.receiveAnswerFromOracle(bytes32 response)". Other implementation details include how to sign the response, pay for gas, and so forth.

So, the Oracle will talk to a contract if all goes well.

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    You can, if you wanted to (I'm not sure why you would) send ether to 0x0 to burn it. – Thomas Jay Rush Mar 6 '17 at 4:13
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0x00... doesn't mean a null address but a valid address there is also a 0x111...

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