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I was wondering if it's possible to calculate the initial mint date for a token.

I was thinking perhaps one could check the block-timestamp for the transaction in which a token was first minted?

I was also thinking that this should only be valid for tokens pointing to the IPFS - to prevent someone pretending to mint something in the past - by changing the metadata on their server to relate to a token they hadn't originally minted

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  • Did you ever find a way ?
    – Stormsson
    Commented Sep 11, 2022 at 19:25
  • @Stormsson Haven't implemented this yet, but each NFT is minted in a transaction, and each transaction has a time it was processed at - with usually around 15 seconds of accuracy
    – Tobi
    Commented Sep 12, 2022 at 2:28
  • I think I'm missing one important piece of info: how do you find the tx by interacting with the smart contract ? I am used to use the ABI somehow, but I wouldn't say there's a way from this approach
    – Stormsson
    Commented Sep 12, 2022 at 6:17

1 Answer 1

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Most ERC721 NFTs have a Transfer log in the transaction receipts where you can see the initial mint from 0x0 address to target address/contract. You can trace that transaction to its associated blocknumber which will have a timestamp.

I've heard that the miners set the timestamp for mined blocks, but not sure if that's true. Might be best to validate against a service like etherscan

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  • its true, miners set the block timestamp - however they only have a 15-second window for their timestamp, which I believe is fine for my application. Is this Transfer log part of the specification? If not I wouldn't want to rely on it
    – Tobi
    Commented Feb 23, 2022 at 20:35
  • It's part of the transaction receipt, assuming an event was generated from the transaction. Here's an example etherscan.io/tx/… Commented Feb 23, 2022 at 20:45
  • Sorry what should I be looking for on that page?
    – Tobi
    Commented Feb 23, 2022 at 21:01

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