3

I was syncing the ETC chain on parity through tor. Everything worked fine. I got to block 3,000,001. Everything stopped, I realized there was a hardfork. I updated the software (ETH worked fine), but I never could find any peers or sync anymore after that on the ETC chain. I tried version 1.4.10, and 1.5 with fresh installs on linux. Nothing seems to work anymore for parity through tor for classic.

According to these github posts https://github.com/ethcore/parity/issues/4343 it seems that the parity install comes with some addresses of known nodes, but that list is outdated or those nodes are no longer working, and I can't find new ones because peer discovery is done through UDP and tor only runs through TCP. Is this an accurate understanding? If so what can I do to find out about new nodes to add manually by passing their enode URI to --reserved-peers as explained in that github post?

3

...and I can't find new ones because peer discovery is done through UDP and tor only runs through TCP. Is this an accurate understanding?

Yes.

As per the issue thread you linked to, you could attempt to add peers (using --reserved-peers) from the hard-coded bootnodes list in the ETC (go-ethereum, not Parity) codebase, located in bootnodes.go.

The list, as of late January 2017, is as follows:

enode://08c7ee6a4f861ff0664a49532bcc86de1363acd608999d1b76609bb9bc278649906f069057630fd9493924a368b5d1dc9b8f8bf13ac26df72512f6d1fabd8c95@45.32.7.81:30303
enode://e809c4a2fec7daed400e5e28564e23693b23b2cc5a019b612505631bbe7b9ccf709c1796d2a3d29ef2b045f210caf51e3c4f5b6d3587d43ad5d6397526fa6179@174.112.32.157:30303
enode://687be94c3a7beaa3d2fde82fa5046cdeb3e8198354e05b29d6e0d4e276713e3707ac10f784a7904938b06b46c764875c241b0337dd853385a4d8bfcbf8190647@95.183.51.229:30303
enode://6e538e7c1280f0a31ff08b382db5302480f775480b8e68f8febca0ceff81e4b19153c6f8bf60313b93bef2cc34d34e1df41317de0ce613a201d1660a788a03e2@52.206.67.235:30303
enode://ca5ae4eca09ba6787e29cf6d86f7634d07aae6b9e6317a59aff675851c0bf445068173208cf8ef7f5cd783d8e29b85b2fa3fa358124cf0546823149724f9bde1@138.68.1.16:30303
enode://217ebe27e89bf4fec8ce06509323ff095b1014378deb75ab2e5f6759a4e8750a3bd8254b8c6833136e4d5e58230d65ee8ab34a5db5abf0640408c4288af3c8a7@188.138.1.237:30303
enode://fa20444ef991596ce99b81652ac4e61de1eddc4ff21d3cd42762abd7ed47e7cf044d3c9ccddaf6035d39725e4eb372806787829ccb9a08ec7cb71883cb8c3abd@50.149.116.182:30303
enode://4bd6a4df3612c718333eb5ea7f817923a8cdf1bed89cee70d1710b45a0b6b77b2819846440555e451a9b602ad2efa2d2facd4620650249d8468008946887820a@71.178.232.20:30304
enode://921cf8e4c345fe8db913c53964f9cadc667644e7f20195a0b7d877bd689a5934e146ff2c2259f1bae6817b6585153a007ceb67d260b720fa3e6fc4350df25c7f@51.255.49.170:30303
enode://ffea3b01c000cdd89e1e9229fea3e80e95b646f9b2aa55071fc865e2f19543c9b06045cc2e69453e6b78100a119e66be1b5ad50b36f2ffd27293caa28efdd1b2@128.199.93.177:3030
enode://ee3da491ce6a155eb132708eb0e8d04b0637926ec0ae1b79e63fc97cb9fc3818f49250a0ae0d7f79ed62b66ec677f408c4e01741504dc7a051e274f1e803d454@91.121.65.179:40404
enode://48e063a6cf5f335b1ef2ed98126bf522cf254396f850c7d442fe2edbbc23398787e14cd4de7968a00175a82762de9cbe9e1407d8ccbcaeca5004d65f8398d759@159.203.255.59:30303
enode://42d8f29d1db5f4b2947cd5c3d76c6d0d3697e6b9b3430c3d41e46b4bb77655433aeedc25d4b4ea9d8214b6a43008ba67199374a9b53633301bca0cd20c6928ab@104.155.176.151:30303
  • How do I actually type that in the terminal though? Like, parity -j --chain=classic --reserved-peers (then do I copy and paste them and separate them with commas?) – tod87 Feb 22 '17 at 23:03
  • I've tidied up the list. Copy and paste it into a file, then pass the file as the argument to the --reserved-peers flag. :) – Richard Horrocks Feb 22 '17 at 23:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.